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4340

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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 8.15 S-N data for SAE 4340 steel ground with various abrasives. AISI 4340 conditions: quenched and tempered to 50 HRC, surface grinding, cantilever bending, zero mean stress, 75 °C. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 6.13 Isothermal transformation diagram for 4340 steel and isothermal heat treatments applied to produce various microstructures for fracture evaluation. Source: Ref 6.16 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 6.15 Fracture morphologies of fracture surfaces of 4340 steel CVN specimens heat treated as: (a) oil quenched and tempered at 200 °C (390 °F) and (b) isothermally transformed at 430 °C (810 °F). Source: Ref 6.16 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 3.21 Microstructure of an AISI/SAE 4340 cast steel gear in the (a) as-cast condition consisting of dendrites of bainite (gray etching constituent) and interdendritic regions of ferrite (light etching constituent) and pearlite (dark etching constituent), (b) carburized condition More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 5.41 Micrographs of a water-quenched AISI/SAE 4340 steel with a fully martensitic microstructure. Micrograph (a) was taken in bright-field illumination, and micrograph (b) was taken with dark-field illumination. Note the clarity of the prior austenite grain boundaries in the dark-field More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 18.12 Mechanical properties as a function of tempering temperature for 4340 steel tempered for times of 1 h. Ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), reduction of area (RA), and total elongation (etel) are plotted, and the properties for low-temperature-tempered (LTT More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 18.26 Engineering stress-strain curves for quenched 4340 steel tempered at various temperatures for 1 h. Courtesy of Young-Kook Lee. Source: Ref 18.31 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 18.29 Strain hardening as a function of true strain in quenched 4340 specimens tensile tested after tempering at various temperatures for 1 h. Courtesy of Young-Kook Lee. Source: Ref 18.31 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.13 Intergranular fracture surface of CVN-tested 4340 steel oil quenched and tempered at 350 °C (660 °F). SEM micrograph. Courtesy of J. Materkowski. Source: Ref 19.41 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.19 Room temperature CVN energy absorbed for hardened 4340 steel specimens containing either 0.03 or 0.003% P, austenitized at 870 °C (1598 °F), oil quenched, and tempered at temperatures shown for 1 h. Source: Ref 19.49 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.20 Intergranular fracture of 4340 steel containing 0.03% P and tempered at 400 °C (750 °F). Specimen was broken by impact loading at room temperature. Source: Ref 19.49 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.21 Flat cleavage facets and microvoids on fracture surface of 4340 steel containing 0.003% P and tempered at 350 °C (662 °F). Specimen was broken by impact loading at room temperature. Source: Ref 19.49 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.22 Interlath carbides formed during tempering of 4340 steel containing 0.003% P at 350 °C (660 °F). (a) Bright-field image. (b) Dark-field image taken with a cementite diffracted beam. Transmission electron microscope micrographs. Source: Ref 19.49 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.29 Static fatigue curves for quenched and tempered 4340 notched specimens charged with hydrogen and baked at 150 °C (300 °F) for the times shown. Source: Ref 19.97 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.9 Cylindrical bars of AISI 4340 steel. Each figure presents the macrograph (no etching) and the corresponding micrograph. (a)–(c): Bars with 25 mm (1 in.) diameter, austenitized in a hydrogen atmosphere at 1120 °C (2050 °F) and subjected to isothermal heat treatment at 338 °C (640 °F More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.11 Results of the heat treatment of samples of steel AISI 4340 charged with a high content of hydrogen, superimposed on the TTT curve. The samples have suffered isothermal heat treatment at the indicated temperatures and times, and were then quenched. “F” indicates the occurrence More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.31 AISI 4340 steel heated in an oxidizing atmosphere at 850 °C (1560 °F). Severe surface decarburization. Etchant: nital. Courtesy of Villares Metals S.A., Sumaré, SP, Brazil. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.60 Crack caused by quenching stresses in an AISI 4340 cylindrical bar. Reprinted with permission from ASM. Source: Ref 35 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.94 Cross section transverse to the surface of a part made of AISI 4340 steel quenched, tempered, and nitrided. The white layer, rich in high-hardness nitride, can be observed (see Ref 3 .) Courtesy of A. Zeemann, Tecmetal, RJ, Brazil. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 15.1 (Part 1) (a) AISI 4320, (b) AISI 4330, (c) AISI 4340, (d) AISI 4350, (e) AISI 4360, (f) AISI 4380, (g) AISI 4390, and (h) AISI 43100 steels with different carbon contents quenched and tempered at 200 °C (390 °F). The microstructure is composed of tempered martensite. Starting More