1-20 of 42 Search Results for

304H

Sort by
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.67 Cross section of a Type 304H reheater tube showing two wastage flats with the maximum wastage. Note the wastage flats on both sides of the tube surface where the flue gas impinging at the 90° location (i.e., facing the ruler in the photo). Courtesy of Welding Services Inc. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.70 Optical micrograph showing Type 304H reheater (the same one shown in Fig. 10.67 ) that suffered carburization on the surface where severe coal-ash corrosion took place (about 2 and 10 o’clock positions). Courtesy of Welding Services Inc. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.71 Type 304H reheater (the same one shown in Fig 10.67) at 3 or 9 o’clock positions, where no severe coal-ash corrosion attack occurred, showing no carburization attack. Courtesy of Welding Services Inc. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.75 Cross section of a Type 304H reheater tube suffering fly-ash erosion/corrosion damage. Courtesy of Welding Services Inc. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.88 The cross section of alloy 72/304H overlay tube after testing as part of the reheater (1000 °F steam) for 3½ years in a 255 MW(e) subcritical boiler, which burned high chlorine coal (about 0.3%). The 304H reheater tubes exhibited a typical 4 year life. Courtesy of Welding Services More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.89 The cross section of alloy 52/304H overlay tube after testing as part of the reheater (538 °C, or 1000 °F steam) for 3½ years in a 255 MW(e) subcritical boiler, which burned high chlorine coal (about 0.3%), showing slight pitting attack. The 304H reheater tubes exhibited a typical 4 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 14.15 Type 304H tested in air + 4CO 2 + 8H 2 O at 610 °C (1130 °F) under the strain rate of 3 × 10 –8 /s with about 2% strain, showing preferential oxidation penetration (the authors referred to as ″cracking″). SEM/EDX analysis showed the oxide in area A was Fe-3Cr-4Si-0.5Mo, in area B More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.76 Scanning electron micrograph (backscattered electron image) showing fly-ash deposits (46.4 Si-21.6Al-20.7Fe) (marked 1) on the surface of Type 304H reheater ( Fig. 10.75 ) that suffered the maximum wastage at location 30° away from the direct flue gas impingement point. The 304H More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.73 Optical micrograph showing the morphology of the corrosion attack on the 304H superheater tube at the severely wasted area. Courtesy of Welding Services Inc. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.68 Surface appearance of one of the wastage flats with the maximum wastage of the 304H reheater tube shown in Fig. 10.67 . Courtesy of Welding Services Inc. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.77 Scanning electron micrograph showing the oxide scales formed on the nearby location of the one shown in Fig. 10.76 on the severely wasted area for Type 304H reheater tube. Courtesy of Welding Services Inc. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.78 Scanning electron micrograph showing ash deposits that formed at the 12 o’clock position where the flue gas made a direct impingement on the Type 304H reheater tube ( Fig. 10.75 ). This location showed significantly less tube wall wastage. Courtesy of Welding Services Inc. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.74 Scanning electron micrograph showing the corrosion products (general corrosion scales and internal corrosion phases) on Type 304H superheater at the severely wasted area. The EDX analysis showed that the corrosion product (area 1) was Cr-Fe-rich sulfide (45.5Cr-33.5Fe-9.2Ni-8.6S More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.69 Scanning electron micrograph (backscattered electron image) showing the corrosion products formed on the maximum wastage area of Type 304H reheater shown in Fig. 10.67 . Semiquantative EDX analysis shows the compositions (wt%) at different locations as indicated below. Courtesy More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pmsspmp.t52000219
EISBN: 978-1-62708-312-6
... 38 61 ND 15 6.4 SS-304N2-33 33 … 5.0 57 40 10.0 16.5 0.25 25.0 127 47 62 ND 18 6.5 SS-304N2-38 38 … 8.0 70 45 13.0 20.0 0.27 55.0 ND 47 68 ND 23 6.9 SS-304H-20 20 … 7.0 40 25 10.0 17.0 0.25 20.0 85 25 35 ND (c) 6.6 SS-304L-13 13 … 15.0...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080259
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fibtca.t52430087
EISBN: 978-1-62708-253-2
... … … … … … Super 304H 0.10 0.2 0.8 18.0 9.0 … … 0.4 0.10N 3.0Cu AISI 310 0.25 1.5 2.0 24.0 19.0 … … … … … AISI 316 0.08 1.0 2.0 17.0 12.0 2.5 … … … … TP316H 0.08 0.6 1.6 16.0 12.0 2.5 … … … … AISI 321 0.09 1.0 2.0 17.0 11.0 … … … … 0.15Ti TP321H...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080379
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
.... The stress-assisted preferential corrosion attack is quite sensitive to the environment. Le Calvar et al. ( Ref 10 ) performed low strain rate tests in air + 4CO 2 + 8H 2 O at 610 °C (1130 °F). Figure 14.15 shows Type 304H suffering preferential oxidation penetration under this test condition at a strain...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310269
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
... 0.030 … … 304L S30403 0.03 0.10 18.0–20.0 8.0–10.5 2.0 … 1.00 0.045 0.030 … … 304H S30409 0.04–0.10 … 18.0–20.0 8.0–10.5 2.0 … 1.00 0.045 0.030 … … 304N S30451 0.08 0.10–0.16 18.0–20.0 8.0–10.5 2.0 … 1.00 0.045 0.030 … … 304HN S30452 0.08 0.16–0.30...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.hss.t52790241
EISBN: 978-1-62708-356-0
..., and 501. Forty-six AISI numbers and their corresponding chemical compositions were published in 1932, twenty-eight of which are still in use. Many new AISI numbers were added that were primarily modifications, using suffix letters, such as 304L, 304H, 304N, and 420F. AISI 329 was the only duplex...