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1018

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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 69 Residual-stress distribution of carburized SAE 1018 steel with a film-carbide layer formed due to a high carburizing potential. The surface layer consisted of 16% Fe 3 C, 16% retained austenite, and the balance was as-quenched martensite. More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 8.31 Air-cooled AISI/SAE 1018 steel showing a ferrite plus pearlite microstructure. Equal parts 4% picral (aged) mixed with 2% nital etch. 200× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 8.32 Cold-finished AISI/SAE 1018 steel showing ferrite plus pearlite microstructure. Equal parts 4% picral (aged) mixed with 2% nital etch. 200× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 8.53 Differential interference contrast used for an air-cooled AISI/SAE 1018 steel (the same sample shown in Fig. 8.31 ). 4% picral followed by 2% nital etch. 1000× More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 3.9 Heating ( chauffage ) curve for a 1018 steel More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 3.10 Cooling ( refroidissement ) curve for a 1018 steel More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.9 A wrought 1018 steel slow cooled from 900 °C (1650 °F) to room temperature. The structure is dominated by white ferrite grains with only a small volume fraction of dark pearlite grains. Deformation direction is horizontal. Nital etch. Original magnification: 240× More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.10 SEM micrograph of a cleavage fracture surface on a 1018 steel. Original magnification 160× More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.12 SEM micrograph of a ductile fracture surface on a 1018 steel. Original magnification 2300× More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 8.12 Grain growth in a plain carbon 1018 steel versus a triple-alloyed 8620 steel at 1010 °C (1850 °F). The alloying elements cause a grain-boundary drag effect and inhibit grain growth. Source: Ref 8.7 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 17.8 Section of a pack-carburized square bar of 1018 steel More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 17.15 Micrograph of a 1018 steel after nitrocarburizing at 570 °C (1060 °F) for 3 h and oil quenching. Source: Ref 17.2 , p 425 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. A.3 Flow stress of AISI 1018 sheet (2.13 mm) obtained by viscous pressure bulge test. Experimental strain range, bulge test: 0 to 1 More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 3 Effect of carbon on hardenability of carburized 1018 steel. Composition of 0.17 C, 0.72 Mn, 0.01 Si, 0.01 Cr, 0.007 Mo, with McQuaid-Ehn grain size 6–8. All bars normalized 925 °C (1700 °F). Core—austenitized 20 min, 925 °C. Case—pack carburized 9 h, 925 °C, direct quenched. Source More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 3.27 Surface tensile stresses in the outer layer of a carburized SAE 1018 steel caused by the presence of carbides. Source: Ref 42 More
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Published: 30 April 2024
Fig. 7.9 Effect of ammonia content of carbonitriding gas on hardness gradient: 1018 steel carbonitrided at (a) 790 °C (1455 °F) for 2.5 h and (b) 845 °C (1550 °F) for 2.5 h. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 30 April 2024
Fig. 11.22 Retained austenite in 1018 steel carbonitrided at three different temperatures. Bar 28.5 mm (1.12 in.) in diameter quenched in 55 °C (130 °F) oil. More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 4.10 Uniform compression samples before and after deformation (left to right: AISI 1018 steel, INCO 718, Ti-6Al-4V) More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 8.52 Differential interference contrast used to reveal cold work in an AISI/SAE 1018 steel (the same sample shown in Fig. 8.32 ). 4% picral followed by 2% nital etch. 1000× More
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Published: 30 April 2024
Fig. 7.14 Decrease of surface hardness with increasing temperature for specimens of 1018 steel carbonitrided under the conditions indicated. Rockwell C hardness converted from Rockwell 30-N. Source: Ref 2 More