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Abstract

Hydrogen damage is a form of environmentally assisted failure that results most often from the combined action of hydrogen and residual or applied tensile stress. This chapter classifies the various forms of hydrogen damage, summarizes the various theories that seek to explain hydrogen damage, and reviews hydrogen degradation in specific ferrous and nonferrous alloys. The preeminent theories for hydrogen damage are based on pressure, surface adsorption, decohesion, enhanced plastic flow, hydrogen attack, and hydride formation. The specific alloys covered are iron-base, nickel, aluminum, copper, titanium, zirconium, vanadium, niobium, and tantalum alloys.

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Hydrogen Damage, Corrosion in the Petrochemical Industry, 2nd ed., Edited By Victoria Burt, ASM International, 2015, p 148–161, https://doi.org/10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030148

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