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weld joint configuration

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Image
Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 1 Some recommended welded joint configurations for compression, shear, and tension loading More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002408
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... alloy selection, weld joint configuration, and residual stress. The two categories of techniques that can result in improved fatigue life, such as modification of weld toe geometry and introduction of compressive residual stresses in the surface material, are detailed. The article analyzes the influence...
Image
Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 3 Offset double-V joint configuration used to weld thick section aluminum armor plate More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001377
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract This article reviews forge welding and illustrates the typical joint configurations used for manual and automatic forge welding applications. automatic forge welding forge welding manual forge welding FORGE WELDING (FOW) is a solid-state process in which the workpieces...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0005721
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... are not included in this glossary. Examples here include weld joint configurations (e.g., tee joints, lap joints, etc.) and related nomenclature and cutting tool geometries (e.g., clearance angles, rake angles, etc.). These terms are defined and illustrated in the Sections “Joining” and “Machining,” respectively...
Image
Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 1 Typical joint configurations used for manual forge welding applications. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 2 Recommended joint configurations used in automatic forge welding applications. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 10 Selected joint configurations and welding inserts used in GTAW processes. (a) Y-type insert, 5 32 in., for indexing when accessibility is limited; no land required. (b) Compound bevel with open root, 1 8 in. gap; land, 1 16 in. thick. Washer-type insert More
Image
Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Basic configuration of joints and resultant welds formed in resistance seam welding. Adapted from Welding Handbook , 8th ed., Vol 2, American Welding Society, 1991, p 554 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 3 Joint configurations for welding 13 mm ( 1 2 in.) Nickel 200 and subsequent crack in weld metal caused by excessive heat input. Dimensions given in inches More
Image
Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 3 Placement of welds to join three sheets of metal in a T-joint. (a) Configuration that can be used to join three stock thicknesses. (b) Recommended configuration incorporating scalloped edges to permit alternate welding of spots in two thicknesses only More
Image
Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Typical joint configurations used for manual forge welding applications. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 2 Recommended joint configurations used in automatic forge welding applications. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 6 Basic configuration of joints and resultant welds formed in resistance seam welding. (a) Lap seam front view. (b) Lap seam side view. (c) Butt weld front view More
Image
Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 3 Basic configuration of joints and resultant welds formed in resistance seam welding. (a) Lap seam welding. (b) Mash seam welding. (c) Finish seam with chamfered electrode. (d) Electrode wire seam welding. More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005614
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... geometry, part configuration, melt-zone configuration, weld atmosphere (vacuum and nonvacuum), and joint design. It describes various aspects considered in EBW of thin and thick metal sections and poorly accessible joints. An overview of scanning and joint tracking techniques for inspection of electron...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001444
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Electron-beam welding (EBW) can produce deep, narrow, and almost parallel-sided welds with low total heat input and relatively narrow heat-affected zones in a wide variety of common and exotic metals. This article discusses the joint configurations and shrinkage stresses encountered...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005626
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
...-projection welding of heavy-, intermediate-, and thin-gage sheet mild steel as well as the welds between dissimilar thickness joints. The article also considers the solid-projection welding of steels: annular, nut, and cross-wire projection configurations. It also details the various tests that can be used...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005567
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... a weld by heating two or more workpieces to the welding temperature and forcing them through an extrusion die. This article illustrates typical joint configurations used for manual and automatic forge welding applications. It provides information on the common metals welded by coextrusion welding...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003043
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
..., including corrosion compatibility, fastener materials and strength, head configurations, importance of clamp-up, interference fit fasteners, lightning strike protection, blind fastening, and sensitivity to hole quality. Types of fusion bonding are presented, namely, thermal welding, friction welding...