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wear map

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Book Chapter

By S.C. Lim
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006396
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... Abstract This article describes the usefulness of wear maps and explains how to construct a proper wear map from scratch and effectively employ such a map to make important design decisions for a particular tribological situation. It discusses three categories of wear-data presentation: numeric...
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 5 Wear map of the AISi polyester coating in terms of wear mechanism at room temperature as a function of incursion rate and blade tip velocity. Source: Ref 24 More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 24 Quantitative wear map for aluminum alloys with iso-wear-rate lines superimposed on the wear mechanism map. Source: Ref 161 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 36 Wear map of the aluminum-silicon polymer system at ambient temperature when abraded by a 3.0 mm (0.12 in.) thick titanium blade. The map is based on 36 individual experiments, many of which were repeated; therefore, the confidence in the map is high. Arrows indicate movement of wear More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 11 Essential components of a two-dimensional wear map. A useful and meaningful map is one that has a wide range of value for both axes. Wear data could be presented either in the form of contours of constant wear rate or as individual data points with numeric values. The dominant wear More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 3 Wear map for unlubricated sliding between two steel surfaces. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 11 Wear maps for (a) treated and (b) nontreated 316 stainless steel. T316 stainless steel: treated by low-temperature carburization. NT316 stainless steel: nontreated (as received). Note the significant improvement in wear rates for treated vs. nontreated surfaces for the same loads More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 20 Wear mapping graph of sliding ceramic pairs in dry air (ball-on-three flats, Ø ball = 12.7 mm, or 0.5 in.) indicating transition lines from mild to severe wear and the distinct regions More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 6 Dry sliding wear maps. (a) Steels. Source: Ref 5 , 17 . (b) 7071 aluminum alloy sliding against AISI 32100 steel. Source: Ref 18 . (c) Low-metallic-friction material sliding against pearlitic cast iron. Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 12 SEM micrographs of wear band on lower bead. (a) Chromium map. (b) Iron map. (c) Zinc map. (d) Secondary electron image after ∼49,000 drawings More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 7 Wear-mechanism map for alumina proposed by Kong and Ashby. In this map, the parameter used for the vertical axis is the same normalized pressure as in Fig. 4 , while the normalized velocity has the same definition as the one in Fig. 4 . Adapted from Ref 24 More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 5 Wear-transition map for steels showing the regions of mild wear and severe wear. The sliding conditions corresponding to the three types of wear transitions observed are also indicated. The field boundaries for the ultramild-wear and mild oxidational-wear regimes (as seen in Fig. 4 More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 3 (a) Wear mode and (b) wear mechanism map of AISI 303 (UNS S30300) stainless steel sliding against AISI 8620 (UNS G86200) low-alloy steel pin. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 Wear-mechanism map for unlubricated sliding of a steel couple. The normalized pressure is the contact pressure divided by hardness. The normalized velocity is the velocity multiplied by the ratio of the radius of the contact to the thermal diffusivity. The contour lines are lines More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 1 Qualitative materials map. Dominating micromechanisms of abrasive wear with respect to material fracture toughness and hardness. MMC, metal-matrix composite; FTC, fused tungsten carbide. Source: Ref 12 More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 3 Fretting wear damage map showing mode of damage as a function of relative displacement between components. Source: Ref 11 , 12 , 13 , 14 More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 2 Wear-regime map for soft steels proposed by Childs. Adapted from Ref 8 More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 4 Wear-mechanism map for the unlubricated sliding of steels. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 6 Wear-mechanism map for aluminum and aluminum alloys proposed by Liu et al. The contours of normalized wear rates are superimposed on regimes of different dominant wear mechanisms. Individual wear-rate data points are also given in the map. Adapted from Ref 16 More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 8 Empirical wear-mechanism map for Al(6061)/SiC w composite proposed by Wang et al. However, the range of sliding condition covered in this map is rather limited. Source: Ref 28 More