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wave soldering

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Book Chapter

By Paul T. Vianco
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001401
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract This article focuses on the design considerations and process parameters critical to the successful implantation of wave soldering on printed circuit boards. The design considerations include the through-hole technology and the surface-mount technology. The article presents information...
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Schematic of the wave soldering process. The three important process control regions are the entry (A), the interior (B), and the peel-back region (C). More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 2 Schematic of preferred device orientation for wave-soldered assemblies. SOIC, small-out-line integrated circuit (surface-mount); DIP, dual-inline package (through-hole) More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 12 Scanning electron micrograph of Sn-40Pb alloy wave-soldered printed circuit board joint that was thermally cycled. Micrograph shows a typical thermal fatigue crack in the joint. The crack is at a 45° angle to the circuit lead and totally encircles it. 50× More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 13 Sn-40Pb alloy, section of a wave-soldered printed circuit board joint that was thermally cycled. Structure shows a thermal fatigue crack propagating through the tin-lead fillet. The tin-lead structure has coarsened in the highly stressed region near the crack. Etchant 7, Table 1 . 80× More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 9 Selected soldering techniques used for high-volume production applications. (a) Dipping on a static bath. (b) Wave soldering system. (c) Cascade soldering system More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 12 Leaded components versus surface-mount device (SMD) mounting to printed wiring board (PWB). (a) Leaded component mounted by means of through holes, crimped, and ready for wave solder. (b) SMD attached to PWB with adhesive and ready for soldering step More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001344
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract This article presents an introduction to brazing, including information on its mechanics, advantages, and limitations. It reviews soldering with emphasis on chronology, solder metals, and flux technology. The article also provides useful information on mass, wave, and drag soldering...
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Schematic showing simple oil injection of a solder wave More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001346
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Soldering is defined as a joining process by which two substrates are bonded together using a filler metal with a liquidus temperature. This article provides an overview of fundamentals of soldering and presents guidelines for flux selection. Types of fluxes, including rosin-base...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001479
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
.... The entire assembly is then passed over a wave of molten solder. Because of pressure and a capillary wetting action, the solder travels up the holes, fills the plated holes, and bonds with the plating and the lead. These joints have sufficient solder to serve as a mechanical and electrical interconnection...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001460
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... specifications. Excessive contaminant levels are detrimental to the quality of solder joints made by full-scale assembly equipment. Such processes, which use large baths as the solder source (wave, drag, or dip soldering), are particularly prone to impurity buildup from the dissolution of PWB and lead finishes...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005647
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
...% volume percent VPPA variable polarity plasma arc W watt WI wettability index WRC Welding Research Council WS wave soldering WSN weld set number wt% weight percent XPS x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy yr year Z atomic number ...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001092
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
... continues to gain in importance, particularly for the joining of back-plane connector pins to printed boards. Wave soldering has been performed satisfactorily with these alloys, but indium-base solders tend to dross slightly more than do tin-lead alloys. Indium-base solders are generally considered...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003211
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
...: Soldering iron or bit Flame or torch soldering Hot dip soldering Induction soldering Resistance soldering Furnace soldering Infrared soldering Ultrasonic soldering Wave soldering Laser soldering Hot gas soldering Vapor-phase soldering Each of the methods is described...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004173
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... gaps at the terminal entries ( Fig. 22 ). Moreover, the resistor network was mounted on the wave-soldered side of the printed circuit board and, hence, was immersed in chlorine-containing flux just before exposure to the thermal shock of the high-temperature solder wave. Following the soldering...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005552
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
...; and fusion welding with directed energy sources, such as laser welding, electron beam welding. The article reviews the different types of nonfusion welding processes, regardless of the particular energy source, which is usually mechanical but can be chemical, and related subprocesses of brazing and soldering...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0005663
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... wettability index <T stress; standard deviation RT room temperature WRC Welding Research Council WS wave soldering I summation of RW resistance welding WSN weld set number wt% weight percent '[ applied stress RWMA Resistance Welder Manufacturers XPS x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy w angular velocity...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005646
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... wetting by the welding circuit through which current is con- backing shoe A nonconsumable backing device solder. ducted and which terminates at the arc. used in electroslag and electrogas welding. actual throat The shortest distance between the arc welding gun A device used in semiauto- weld root...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.9781627081733
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3