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void coalescence

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Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 13 McClintock model of void coalescence by shear from (a) initial circular voids, through (b) growth, and (c) void contact More
Image
Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 21 McClintock model of void coalescence by shear from (a) initial circular voids, through (b) growth, and (c) void contact or coalescence. More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006775
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... and fracture. Next, the mechanisms of void nucleation and void coalescence are briefly described. Macroscale and microscale appearances of ductile and brittle fracture are then discussed for various specimen geometries (smooth cylindrical and prismatic) and loading conditions (e.g., tension compression...
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 4 Failed second-stage turbine blade. (a) Photograph of failed blade, with fracture at the top of the image. (b) Stereomicroscopic image of fracture surface showing coarse, intergranular topology. (c) Scanning electron fractograph showing void coalescence on fracture surface. (d) Optical More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005606
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... size, as exists in superplastic alloys, should create higher rates of void coalescence via grain-boundary diffusion. However, because the chemical potential driving force for grain-boundary diffusion mechanisms is partly dependent on the angle between the applied pressure and a particular grain...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001350
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... size, as exists in superplastic alloys, should create higher rates of void coalescence via grain boundary diffusion. However, because the chemical potential driving force for grain boundary diffusion mechanisms is partly dependent on the angle between the applied pressure and a particular grain...
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 5 Waterside surface, hot side, near the failure. Carbides in prior pearlite colonies have completely spheroidized from overheating. Creep voids have developed at grain boundaries; some of these voids have grown and coalesced. Original magnification 210× More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 31 Waterside surface, hot side, near failure. Carbides in prior pearlite colonies have completely spheroidized from overheating. Creep voids have developed at grain boundaries; some of these voids have grown and coalesced. Original magnification 210×. See the article “High-Temperature More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002349
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... that is basic to shear lip formation in a tensile test and to the final shearing mode (“internal necking”) occurs during void coalescence. However, for cleavage (brittle fracture, which is by far the most worrisome type of fracture), the corresponding ideal strength is the ideal tensile strength first estimated...
Image
Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 800 View of the shear-lip region of the fracture surface in Fig. 798 . Microvoid coalescence here has produced shear dimples with characteristic elongated shape. Note the large voids, which formed at inclusions of Ti(C,N). The matrix did not adhere to these inclusions, which allowed More
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003538
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
..., there is evidence of plastic deformation and failure by microvoid coalescence (MVC) ductile tearing. However, exceptions to this fracture progression mode have been reported. One is formation of a specimen-scale shear band (sometimes associated with void sheet formation at the microscale). One set of circumstances...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.a0005528
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
... on cut surfaces produced by guillotining, and significant insight was provided into the process. They concluded that the main mechanism of fracture during shearing is void growth and coalescence. The paper also emphasized the importance of combined shear and tensile stresses in the shear zone. Zhou...
Image
Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 43 Three scales of fracture models in a comprehensive approach to simulation of ductile fracture by void formation, growth, and coalescence. Source: Ref 44 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1996
throughout the material, and subsequently grow and coalesce by means of plastic deformation processes. Voids are nucleated frequently at inclusions but may also be formed in regions of intense, heterogeneous slip. Void linkup is restricted to the necked region of the tensile sample. Source: Ref 7 More
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 12 Hot side (bottom tube half) of waterside surface of roof tube near failure. Carbides in prior-pearlite colonies have completely spheroidized from overheating. Creep voids have developed at grain boundaries, and some have grown and coalesced. Original magnification: 210×. Courtesy More
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 9 (a) Short-term and (b) long-term overheating of boiler tubes. Long-term overheating usually is caused by creep as the microstructure of the material degrades at temperature over time. Grains do not deform, but voids develop at grain-boundary junctions and grow and coalesce over time More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002352
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
...) Ductile tensile fracture propagation is preceded by necking. Microscopic voids form throughout the material, and subsequently grow and coalesce by means of plastic deformation processes. Voids are nucleated frequently at inclusions but may also be formed in regions of intense, heterogeneous slip. Void...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005421
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... Modeling of Cavity Coalescence Cavity coalescence refers to the stage at which voids link together, leading to final fracture. In most models, cavity coalescence/linkage is assumed to occur between first- and second-nearest-neighbor cavities only. If it is postulated that there is no nucleation of new...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005461
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... and amount of particles or precipitates dispersed throughout the material. Increasing volume fraction of particles drastically reduces tensile ductility ( Ref 2 ) by providing sources for void initiation, which then grow and coalesce into cracks with increasing plastic deformation. Process engineers...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003209
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... that produces solid-state coalescence between two materials under the following conditions: Joining occurs at a temperature below the melting point, T m , of the materials to be joined (usually > 1 2 T m ). Coalescence of contacting surfaces is produced with loads below those that would...