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viscoelasticity

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Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003024
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... Abstract This article discusses the deformation and viscoelastic characteristics of plastics as polymeric materials, focusing on the test methods used for the evaluation of their mechanical properties, methods available for analytically predicting the deformation response of polymers...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006941
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... Abstract This article describes the viscoelastic behavior of plastics in their solid state only, from the standpoint of the material deforming without fracturing. The consequences of viscoelasticity on the mechanical properties of plastics are described, especially in terms of time-dependencies...
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 6 Viscoelasticity as shown by the creep and stress relaxation behavior over time More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 7 Spring and dashpot models of viscoelasticity. The Voigt element is considered the better model of creep behavior, while the Maxwell element is considered better for modeling stress relaxation. More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 21 Schematic representation of viscoelastic behavior of a polymer. Loading produces an immediate elastic strain followed by viscous flow. Unloading produces an immediate elastic recovery followed by additional recovery over a period of time. Source: Ref 17 More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 6 Typical viscoelastic behavior of plastics. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 2 Stress-strain response of a viscoelastic estane-based polymeric energetic binder tested at 0 °C (30 °F) measured with magnesium pressure bars and using an incident bar strain-gage gain of 200× and transmitted bar strain-gage gain of 500×. W1, one-wave signal; W2, two-wave signal. Source More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 1 Five regions of viscoelastic behavior for a linear, amorphous polymer. Also illustrated are the effects of crystallinity (dashed line) and cross linking (dotted line). More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 3 Illustration of viscoelastic behavior. Both viscous and elastic natures are observed. (a) Spring and dashpot in (a) series, Maxwell model and (b) parallel, Kelvin-Voigt model. Note that for viscoelastic materials, force depends on both deformation and rate of deformation and vice-versa. More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 12 Viscoelastic regions of polymers More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 2 Creep-recovery response of a viscoelastic material. Source: Ref 5 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0006676
EISBN: 978-1-62708-213-6
... Abstract Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) is a powerful tool for studying the viscoelastic properties and behavior of a range of materials as a function of time, temperature, and frequency. This article describes various systems and equipment used in DMA setup and discusses the processes...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003025
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... Abstract Mechanical properties are often the most important properties in the design and selection of engineering plastics. Temperature, molecular structure, crystallinity, viscoelasticity, and effects of environment, fillers and reinforcements are considered as the basic factors affecting...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003377
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... expansion coefficients, moisture swelling coefficients, static and dynamic viscoelastic properties, conductivity, and moisture diffusivity. unidirectional fiber composites aligned continuous fibers analytical method physical properties elasticity thermal expansion coefficients moisture swelling...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006915
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... with various regions of the viscosity curve. It discusses the concept of shear sensitivity, the nature of viscoelastic properties, and the electrical, chemical, and optical properties of different plastics. It also reviews plastic processing operations, including extrusion, injection molding, and thermoforming...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006928
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... Abstract This article briefly introduces some commonly used methods for mechanical testing. It describes the test methods and provides comparative data for the mechanical property tests. In addition, creep testing and dynamic mechanical analyses of viscoelastic plastics are also briefly...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006944
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... crazing and fracture in polymeric materials, with a review of the behavior of the elastic modulus as a function of temperature or time parameters, emphasizing the importance of the viscoelastic nature of their deformation and fracture. The discussion covers the behavior of polymers under stress, provides...
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 5 Representative diagram of (a) constant stress applied to a material, and resultant (b) solid elastic strain, (c) purely viscous liquid strain, (d) viscoelastic solid strain response. The colors represent: (red) as “solid elastic” material response; (green) as “purely viscous liquid More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 20 Mechanical models and typical behavior. (a) Ideal Hookean solid (σ = E ε ˙ ; spring model; elastic response). (b) Ideal viscous Newtonian liquid (σ = η ε ˙ ; dashpot model). (c) Maxwell's mechanical model for a viscoelastic material. (d) Voigt's mechanical model More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 17 Mechanical models and typical behavior. (a) Ideal Hookean solid (σ = E ε; spring model; elastic response). (b) Ideal viscous Newtonian liquid (σ = η ε ̇ ; dashpot model). (c) Maxwell’s mechanical model for a viscoelastic material. (d) Voigt’s mechanical model for a viscoelastic More