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ventilation

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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 4 Vacuum blasting is an example of local exhaust ventilation. When feasible, local exhaust ventilation is preferable because it controls atmospheric hazards at the source. More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 5 Dust-collection equipment is commonly used to provide dilution ventilation for dusts generated in field abrasive-blasting containments. Dilution ventilation mixes contaminants with mechanically provided fresh air in the work area to reduce the concentration of airborne contaminants. More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 3 Ventilation of a salt bath furnace with (a) a capture hood and (b) a canopy hood. The capture hood in (a) requires a ventilation rate of 200 m 3 /min (7120 ft 3 /min), whereas the canopy hood in (b) requires a larger ventilation rate of 905 m 3 /min (32,000 ft 3 /min). All dimensions More
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Published: 12 September 2022
Fig. 7 Ventilation and oxygenation in hydrogels with vascularized alveolar model topologies. (a) Elaboration of a lung mimetic design through generative growth of the airway, offset growth of opposing inlet and outlet vascular networks, and population of branch tips with a distal lung subunit More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05a.a0005717
EISBN: 978-1-62708-171-9
... and ventilation and heat exhaust. The article provides information on the personal protective equipment for eyes and skin from radiation, and ears from noise. It also discusses other potential safety hazards associated with thermal spraying, namely, magnetic fields and infrasound. dust collector fume gas...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001487
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... soldering thermal spraying thermite welding ventilation welding THIS ARTICLE covers the basic elements of safety general to all welding, cutting, and related processes. It includes safety procedures common to a variety of applications. However, it does not cover all safety aspects of every welding...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05a.a0005759
EISBN: 978-1-62708-171-9
... safety risk assessment sound hazards thermal spray coating thermal spray equipment ventilation warning labeling Scope The scope of this article discusses the safety issues associated with the design and operation of thermal spray booths and boxes. The scope is limited to thermal spray booth...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005635
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
.... If they are to work in an unfamiliar situation or environment, they must be thoroughly briefed on the potential hazards involved. For example, welders who work in confined areas that are poorly ventilated must be thoroughly trained in the proper ventilation practices and be cognizant of the adverse consequences...
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 42 A cross section of a microtunnel in Fig. 41 . Unetched. Original magnification: 125× Corrosion form and mechanism Local corrosion, pitting, formicary corrosion Material Copper Product form Evaporator coils; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 3 Tank painting is a common example of a confined-space work area. Controls such as mechanical ventilation and respiratory protection (which is properly selected, used, and maintained) are necessary to prevent exposures to atmospheric hazards that can become life threatening. More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 16 Outdoor view of indoor closed-loop evaporative towers with fresh air inlet openings at bottom and exhaust out just below the roofline. Roof mounted exhausts fans at this Minnesota foundry supply extra plant ventilation to reduce the humidity inside the plant. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 11 Four methods of dust and fume control in electric furnaces. (a) Prepollution control ventilation for dust and fume removal. (b) Direct furnace dust and fume collection (both front view and top view are shown). (c) Total furnace hood for fume and dust collection. (d) Canopy hood More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006030
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... exposures, for example, in poorly ventilated confined areas, exposure to organic solvent vapors can rapidly result in narcosis and even death. Therefore, controls must be implemented to protect the health of workers applying or removing coatings. Employers can also be subject to citations, fines...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05a.a0005758
EISBN: 978-1-62708-171-9
... lubricants are required, use only oxygen-compatible products. Oxygen may accumulate in areas containing oxygen equipment. Maintain adequate ventilation to prevent and minimize combustion hazards. Oxygen may saturate clothing or other fabric materials. Ventilate clothing saturated with oxygen gas...
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Published: 01 January 2005
. Original magnification: 32× Corrosion form and mechanism Local corrosion, pitting, formicary corrosion Material Copper Product form Evaporator coils; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning More
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Published: 01 January 2005
the insulation was wet. The copper was in a half-hard condition; additional tensile stresses were sometimes found following incorrect handling during installation. Similar instances of SCC have been reported in high-rise buildings where heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems are involved. In Germany More
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Published: 01 January 1994
. (c) Solution must be ventilated. (d) For aluminum-containing alloys. For alloys containing no aluminum, concentrations are 226 g (8 oz) CrO 3 and 326 g (11.5 oz) of 70% HNO 3 and water to make 3.8 L (1 gal). (e) Stainless steel or low-carbon steel lined with polyethylene. (f More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 24A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 June 2023
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v24A.a0006960
EISBN: 978-1-62708-439-0
... if this is without risk. Ventilate the contaminated area. Eliminate sources of ignition. Prevent entry to sewers and public waters. Notify authorities if liquid enters sewers or public waters. Soak up spills with inert solids, such as clay or diatomaceous earth, as soon as possible. Source...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005777
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
Book Chapter

By Roy E. Beal
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001396
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... to avoid splashes or explosions. Suitable protective wear (with guards, where possible) is necessary. Good ventilation is important, because of flux and, possibly, metal fumes. Generally, operators of tin-lead solder dip pots are now checked for lead content in the blood, because of possible health hazards. ...