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turbine blades

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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 1 Macrostructure of three turbine blades: polycrystalline (left), columnar grain directionally solidified (center), and single-crystal directionally solidified (right) More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 3 The evolution of the processing of nickel-base superalloy turbine blades. (a) From left, equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal blades. (b) An exposed view of the internal cooling passages of an aircraft turbine blade. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 11 Hot corrosion attack of René 77 nickel-base alloy turbine blades. (a) Land-based, first-stage turbine blade. Notice deposit buildup, flaking, and splitting of leading edge. (b) Stationary vanes. (c) A land-based, first-stage gas turbine blade that had type 2 hot corrosion attack. (d More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 12 Heat-damaged turbine blades. (a) Heat-damaged first- or second-stage turbine blade (A), which remained intact but with a darkened appearance. It is common to have blades that appear to be in relatively good condition but with an underlying overtemperature condition. (b) Two third-stage More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 13 Flow diagram for remaining life assessment of gas turbine blades More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 14 Sectioning of turbine blades for metallographic examination. (a) Typical locations for cross sectioning of turbine blades. (b) View of Sectioned blade More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 8 Two shipboard turbine blades. Pressure side shown facing out of the page. Arrows denote areas where heavy corrosion products are observed. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 11 Microstructures of nickel-base Alloy 713C turbine blades. (a) Original structure prior to service. (b) Coarsening of γ' precipitates and elimination of secondary γ' caused by 5000 h of service More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 12 (a) Photograph showing one of the intact steam turbine blades from the failed stage. The arrow indicates the fracture location. (b) Photograph of the fracture surface. Scale: millimeters. (c) Scanning electron fractograph of the initiation region showing a mixed transgranular More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 28 (a) Photograph of fourth-stage turbine blades prior to removal. The first blade to fail is indicated with an arrow; an exhaust thermocouple is shown in the foreground. (b) Photograph of blade fracture surface after sectioning. Note the blue discoloration at the trailing edge. (c More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 4 Failed second-stage turbine blade. (a) Photograph of failed blade, with fracture at the top of the image. (b) Stereomicroscopic image of fracture surface showing coarse, intergranular topology. (c) Scanning electron fractograph showing void coalescence on fracture surface. (d) Optical More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 2 Advances in turbine blade materials and processes since 1960. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 2 Directionally solidified turbine blade CM 247 LC More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 4 CM 247 LC directionally solidified turbine blade, as-cast, and supersolutioned microstructures, heat V6692. Micrographs taken from airfoil, transverse orientation. (a) As-cast. 90×. (b) As-cast. 905×. (c) Supersolutioned. 90×. (d) Supersolutioned. 905× More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 15 Cermet turbine blade infiltration mold assembly. Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 14 Investment cast turbine blade with convex wall removed showing complex core More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 9 Two portions of a modified type 403 stainless steel steam turbine blade damaged by liquid impingement erosion. The portion at left was protected by a shield of 1 mm (0.04 in.) thick rolled Stellite 6B brazed onto the leading edge of the blade; the portion at right was unprotected More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 10 Surface appearance at low magnification of a steam turbine blade eroded by water droplets. (a) 12% Cr steel blade material. (b) Stellite 6B shield More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 9 Corrosion products on the grain facets from SCC of a U-700 turbine blade, presumably from combustion-gas attack that induced SCC, with IG and transgranular modes shown More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 57 Grain structure of a Russian forged turbine blade made from ZMI-3U grade after 39,000 h of service. Revealed using: (a) Kalling's No. 2, (b) the Lucas electrolytic reagent (2 V dc, 10 s), and (c) Beraha's tint etch (50 mL HCl, 50 mL water, 0.8 g K 2 S 2 O 5 , 4 g NH 4 F·HF, 1 g FeCl 3 More