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tungsten powders

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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 1 Spherical morphology of (a) molybdenum and (b) tungsten powders used for additive manufacturing via selective laser melting More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 4 Microstructures of tungsten powders processed by selective laser melting. (a) Top view along laser scan. (b) Side view perpendicular to laser scan. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 2 Micrographs of tungsten powder during solid-state sintering, showing the decrease in porosity (black regions) and grain growth. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 3 Scanning electron micrograph of a commercial tungsten powder More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 24
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v24.a0006583
EISBN: 978-1-62708-290-7
... Abstract Tungsten, molybdenum, and cemented carbide parts can be produced using several additive manufacturing technologies. This article classifies the most relevant technologies into two groups based on the raw materials used: powder-bed methods, such as selective laser melting, electron beam...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006121
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
.... The effects of processing conditions on the physical and chemical properties of tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, niobium, and rhenium powders are reviewed. chemical properties molybdenum powders niobium powders physical properties powder production refractory metal powders rhenium powders tantalum...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006052
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract This article discusses the methods and procedures used to extract, purify, and synthesize tungsten carbide powder, metal, and other refractory carbide/nitride powders used in hard metal production. Selection of powders, additives, equipment, and processes for making ready-to-press hard...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006124
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract This article discusses the pressing and sintering of various refractory metal powders for the production of intermediate products as well as special cases of finished products. The metal powders considered include tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, niobium and their alloys, as well...
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 1 Modeling and experimental results for (a) fractional apparent density versus particle size of deagglomerated tungsten powder and (b) fractional green density of compacted tungsten powder (compacting pressure = 240 MPa, or 35,000 psi) versus particle size. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 3 Infiltration process for carbide-infiltrated bit head. Key components include graphite mold (16, 22), tungsten carbide powder (28), tungsten powder (30), steel blank (24), and sand components (18). More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 7 Scanning electron micrograph showing a typical tungsten carbide powder, sized for plasma transferred arc welding deposition. Original magnification: 100× More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 4 Coarse grains in HAZ. 65×. (a) Powder metallurgy tungsten; porosity shown along fusion line. (b) CVD tungsten More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 5 Fractional sintered density versus fractional green density for tungsten specimens. 3N tungsten powder with particle size (FSSS) of 2.2 μm More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 25 Microstructures of a mixture of 48 wt% large tungsten spheres, 48 wt% fine tungsten powder, and 4 wt% nickel, after sintering for various times at 1670 °C (3040 °F). Source: Ref 127 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 26 Microstructure of a mixture of 43 wt% large tungsten spheres, 43 wt% fine tungsten powder, and 14 wt% nickel, after sintering for 60 minutes at 1670 °C (3040 °F). Source: Ref 127 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 3 Sintered density versus sintering temperature for tungsten specimens, 3N tungsten powder with particle sizes (FSSS) of 2.15 μm and 4.05 μm, die-pressed with compacting pressure of 300 MPa (43,500 psi). Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 4 Sintering densification parameter versus sintering time for tungsten compacts sintered at 2100 °C (3810 °F). D s is sintered density; D g is green density; D t is theoretical density. 3N tungsten powder with particle sizes (FSSS) of 2.15 μm and 4.05 μm. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 2 SEM micrographs. (a) Cryomilled AA5083 and B 4 C composite powder showing rounded morphology with rough surface. (b) Tungsten powder showing a cuboidal geometry. Courtesy of University of Central Florida More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 6 Fractional sintered density of W-La 2 O 3 versus the La 2 O 3 content. 3N tungsten powder with particle size (FSSS) of 2.0 μm. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 22 Change in microstructure during liquid-phase sintering of a mixture of fine (10 μm) tungsten powder, 2 wt% of 30 μm nickel spheres and 2 wt% of 125 μm nickel spheres, showing sequential filling of the pores, 1550 °C (2522 °F), (a) the start, (b) after 30 min, (c) after 2 h. Source More