1-20 of 43 Search Results for

truing

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 34 Comparison of truing forces in the nib truing and rotary truing of CB100WBA wheel More
Image
Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 33 Truing methods used for CBN wheels. (a) Stationary tool truing with a nib. (b) Powered truing using a rotary cutter (left) or a rotary cup (right). (c) Form truing using a diamond roll (left), tracing with rotary cutters (center), and a crush roll (right) More
Image
Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 35 Effect of truing infeed on truing force. A, resin and metal bond CBN wheel; B, vitrified CBN wheel; C, conventional vitrified wheel More
Image
Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 30 Typical examples of conditions that require truing More
Image
Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 31 Schematic of a wheel that has been trued and dressed. (a) After truing. Wheel face is smooth and closed. (b) After dressing. Wheel face is open with grits exposed and ready for efficient grinding. (c) After dressing. Bond supports the grit. (d) After dressing. Note path connecting More
Image
Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 36 Effect of intermittent dressing of a CBN wheel on truing forces More
Image
Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 2 Wheel truing of rounded-crest (a) and straight-line (b) thread profiles using diamonds as a truing device. The profile in (a) is generated by a single tool in which the flank surfaces are produced by straight-line motions parallel with the trued profile sections, while the radius More
Image
Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 3 Typical examples of conditions that require truing More
Image
Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 2 Typical examples of conditions that require truing More
Image
Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 3 Schematic of a wheel that has been trued and dressed. 1, after truing, wheel face is smooth and closed; 2, after dressing, wheel face is open with grits exposed and ready for efficient grinding; 3, after dressing, bond supports the grit; 4, after dressing. Note path connecting the tails More
Image
Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 16 Production truing methods used for diamond wheels. (a) Stationary tool truing with a nib. (b) Powered truing using a rotary cutter (left) or a rotary cup (right). (c) Form truing using a diamond roll (left), tracing with rotary cutters (center), and a crush roll (right) More
Image
Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 7 Typical examples of conditions that require truing More
Book Chapter

By K. Subramanian
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002152
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
.... It provides information on the applications of the superabrasive wheels depending on the factors of the grinding system. These factors include machine tool variables, work material, wheel selection, and operational factors. The article describes the methods available for superabrasive wheel truing...
Image
Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 11 Dressing nomenclature for a parallel-axis rotating diamond roll. (a) Wheel sharpness after truing as determined by tracing a stylus device over the trued wheel. (b) Plot of cutting points/unit distance versus relative speed ratio. Source: Ref 4 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 32 Typical conditions that require periodic correction to the wheel face (conditioning). (a) Out-of-form wheel requires precision truing to restore geometry. (b) Poor surface finish caused by bond erosion can be corrected by precision truing of the wheel face. (c) Freeness of cut More
Image
Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 18 Schematic illustrating the relationship between the tensile true stress/true strain (dotted line) and engineering stress/engineering strain (solid line). For engineering strains less than the necking strain, the true stress-strain curve is displaced vertically and to the left relative t... More
Book Chapter

Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002141
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... Abstract This article discusses the various elements of thread grinding processes, including thread grinding machines, tolerances, wheel selection, grinding speed, and grinding fluids. It describes truing of grinding wheels and reviews the process applications. In addition, the article...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003193
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... for grinding and grinding wheels. abrasive belt abrasives bonding finish grinding fluids grinding processes grinding recommendations grinding wheel metal bonds resin bonds tolerance truing vitrified bonds IN ALL GRINDING OPERATIONS, material is removed from the workpiece...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003055
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... of the truing process (defined below) prior to the use of the grinding wheel. In addition, it is required periodically during the use of the grinding wheel in the grinding operation. Several such systems are in commercially available grinding equipment used for electronic ceramics finishing operations. Truing...
Image
Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 41 Diagram showing that minimum grinding power is required during conditioning interval (line A-B). An increase in grinding power or force (line B-C 1 ) can be corrected at point B by precise truing of the wheel face (see Fig. 32a ) or slight dressing (see Fig. 32c ). A gradual decrease More