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Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 2 Orientations of translation shear. (a) Through-the-thickness translation. (b) In-plane translation along a thickness plane. (c) In-plane along a longitudinal plane More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17 Basic computed tomography scanning geometries. (a) Single-detector translate-rotate, first-generation system. (b) Multidetector translate-rotate, second-generation system. (c) Rotate-only (rotate-rotate), third-generation system. (d) Stationary-detector rotate-only, fourth-generation More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 35 Combining images with detector translation enables higher magnification and resolution. (a) Image of a hard drive under 4.25× magnification, stitched from several detector radiographs. (b) Zoomed region of the hard drive under 1.5× magnification, which requires no detector translation. (c More
Image
Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 16 Forces acting on a tooth/bracket system during translation. Source: Ref 235 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 16 Objects with translational symmetry combined with rotational symmetry More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006810
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
...Abstract Abstract In addition to failures in shafts, this article discusses failures in connecting rods, which translate rotary motion to linear motion (and conversely), and in piston rods, which translate the action of fluid power to linear motion. It begins by discussing the origins...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001808
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
...Abstract Abstract This article discusses failures in shafts such as connecting rods, which translate rotary motion to linear motion, and in piston rods, which translate the action of fluid power to linear motion. It describes the process of examining a failed shaft to guide the direction...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002149
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... applications, as wells as the advantages and disadvantages of this technology. It describes the roles of the three basic elements to any modern sensing system: sensing source, signal amplifier, and microprocessor or translator. The article reviews two case studies from two different ends of the metal removal...
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 3 Examples of die motion in rotary forging. (a) Upper die has both translational and rotational motion, while lower die rotates. (b) Upper die has translational, rotational, and orbital (rocking) motion; lower die is stationary. (c) Upper die has orbital (rocking) motion only; lower die has More
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
of the translation vector t that characterizes the displacement of the two crystals with respect to each other. In three dimensions, the orientation relationship requires three parameters, such as the three Euler angles; the grain-boundary normal is given by its unit vector, that is, by two parameters More
Image
Published: 01 January 1997
nodes 2 and 3. (b) Simulating a rigid body. For a rigid body motion Δθ, u 2 = u 1 L sinθ Δθ and v 2 = v 1 + L cos θΔθ. The motion of node 2 is constrained to that of point 1. (c) Joining structural elements to continuum elements. (1) Solid continuum elements with three translational More
Image
Published: 01 December 2009
continuum elements with three translational degrees of freedom per node only. (2) These nodes are slaved to nodes immediately above and below them in order to prevent simulation of the mechanism (hinge). (3) Plate element with bending stiffness (three translational degrees of freedom, two rotational degrees More
Image
Published: 01 January 1997
translation; travel ( z /2) greater than contact length. (g) Plane on plane. Linear translation; travel ( z /2) less than contact length. (h) Sphere in socket. Partial socket (<180°); either member fixed; oscillation in one plane; travel (ϕ/2) greater than contact angle. (i) Sphere in socket. Partial More
Image
Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 30 Master stress versus creep-rate curve for Incoloy 800H between 550 and 750 °C (1020 and 1380 °F) achieved by horizontal translation of data generated on one specimen. Source: Ref 95 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 23 Grain-boundary migration coupled to a shear deformation for a 17.8°<100> symmetrical tilt boundary after 68 min annealing at 375 °C under a tensile stress of 0.27 MPa. The coupling factor, β, is determined as the ratio of lateral grain translation (s) to normal boundary displacement More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 35 The x-ray attenuation (excitation) through an object depends on the ray path. A “pencil” beam of x-rays must pass through more material near the center of the object but must pass through denser material near the bottom of the object. By translating and rotating the sample (or the beam More
Image
Published: 01 December 2009
or twist angle, and R is the rigid body translation. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 41 Key elements of an x-ray fluorescence tomography arrangement. I 0 monitor measures the incident-beam intensity. The x-ray fluorescence is monitored while the sample is rotated and translated by a precision stage. Both the step size of the stage motions and the focal spot size More
Image
Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 4 Organization of a quality function deployment (QFD) “house of quality” product planning table. 1, voice of customer input; 2, specifications for new product; 3, translation between voice of customer and product specifications; 4, market research information; 5, technical benchmarking; 6 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Manual Automatic Abrasive mesh grade 220 120 Specimen pressure, kPa 39 25 Translation speed, m/s 1.7 1.5 (a) Abrasion fluid Water Water (a) Varied from zero to this maximum value, depending on the position on the epicyclic path followed by the specimens. Source: Ref 6 More