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tooth-by-tooth hardening

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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 12 Tooth-by-tooth hardening of a helical gear. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 13 Tooth-by-tooth hardening of a large sprocket. Source: Ref. 1 More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 15 Tooth-by-tooth induction-hardening setup for large gears along with induction-hardening machine for hardening wind turbine large bearing rings with outside diameter as high as 3.5 m (138 in.) and weighing 5 metric tonnes (11,000 lb). Source: Ref 30 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 35 Examples of gap-by-gap inductors used for tooth-by-tooth gear hardening. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 12 Typical characteristic pattern for tooth-by-tooth hardening More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 13 Typical coil and quench bar used for tooth-by-tooth hardening More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 17 Example of equipment for tooth-by-tooth hardening More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 14 Hardness profiles of the tooth crest region of the gear after hardening with various quenching media. Source: Ref 35 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 33 Bending fatigue strength of gear teeth at (a) tooth gap hardening and (b) flank hardening for various steels. Broken lines denote confidence limit according to DIN 3990. Source: Ref 34 , 42 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 6 Representative flame head designs. (a) Gear tooth-hardening flame head. (b) Sheave-hardening flame head. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 23 (a) Broken tooth in chuck jaw after hardening and nitriding. (b) Micrograph showing initiation of crack in brittle white layer and propagation along nitride formed in austenite grain boundaries. Original magnification: 300├Ś More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 18 Two sections of an experimental tooth-by-tooth hardened gear. (A) Section hardened using a coupling gap of 2 mm (0.08 in.). (B) Section hardened using a coupling gap of 3 mm (0.12 in.) More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005867
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... the metallurgy of the core. This article provides an overview of gear technology and materials selection. It describes different gear-hardening patterns, namely, tooth-by-tooth hardening, tip-by-tip hardening, gap-by-gap hardening, spin hardening, single-frequency gear hardening, dual-frequency gear hardening...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005842
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... Abstract This article focuses on the frequently encountered causes of induction coil failures and typical failure modes in fabrication of hardening inductors, tooth-by-tooth gear-hardening inductors, clamshell inductors, contactless inductors, split-return inductors, butterfly inductors...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005847
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... indicator runout of vertical scanners. It presents information on the frequency selection parameters for scanning applications. The article also discusses the critical parameters and production rates in specifying and developing a tooth-by-tooth hardening process. frequency gears horizontal scanners...
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 36 Profile angle error and toothing alignment error after case hardening as function of web thickness for different ratios of hub thickness and tooth height. Courtesy of H. Mallener. Source: Ref 24 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 18 Induction-hardened gear tooth polished with silicon carbide abrasive paper and etched with 10% nital. Courtesy of Materials Evaluation and Engineering, Inc. More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 514 Surface of a bending-fatigue fracture in a tooth (upper tooth in this view) of a large spiral bevel pinion of AISI 8620 steel carburized and hardened to 60 HRC at the surface. The arrow marks the fatigue-crack origin, in the root fillet. The absence of this tooth resulted in fracture More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006820
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... to understand that there has been a huge change in industrial and commercial steel gear metallurgy since the 1950s. Automotive gears have been surface (case) hardened since the 1920s, because harder gears can transmit more power with less wear. However, due to the fear of tooth breakage, the prevailing thought...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002375
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
..., there is a moderate risk of some area on the tooth surface having enough macropits to start a tooth breakage crack when the pinion or gear has a carburized case. Through-hardened parts at 300 HB are not so notch sensitive and will probably not develop cracks from pits. Through-hardened parts at 210 HB are not notch...