1-20 of 295 Search Results for

tool-chip interface

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.a0005519
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
... Fig. 14 Mesh model for a TiC/Al 2 O 3 /TiN-coated tool as used in experiments, based on the individual layer model. Source: Ref 36 Fig. 15 Comparison of predicted average tool-chip interface temperatures with the experimental data. AISI 1045, coated tool, cutting speed ( V c ) = 220 m...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003187
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... to the machining process, is the metal-cutting operation, which involves extensive plastic deformation of the work piece ahead of the tool tip, high temperatures, and severe frictional conditions at the interfaces of the tool, chip, and work piece. This article explains that the basic mechanism of chip formation...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002117
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... situation. Figure 4(c) shows a free body diagram of a chip that has been separated at the shear plane. The resultant force R consists of the friction force, F , and the normal force, N , acting on the tool/chip interface contact area (length ℓ times width w ). The resultant force R ′ consists...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006363
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
..., or both. Because of the high pressures between the chip and rake face, this interface is generally inaccessible to externally applied cutting fluids, particularly for continuous cutting. However, new tool designs that include high-pressure streams directed at the tool-chip interface are being introduced...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002118
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... occurs between the tool and the workpiece Plane strain conditions prevail (that is, no side spread occurs) The stresses on the shear plane are uniformly distributed The resultant force, R , on the chip is equal, opposite, and colinear to the force R ′ at the tool/chip interface ( Fig. 1...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002179
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... encapsulated with lead will lubricate the interface between the metal chip and the cutting tool. Fig. 8 Deformable manganese sulfide and nondeformable oxide (MnOAl 2 O 3 ) inclusions in as-rolled and cold-drawn bars of UNS 12L140 steel. Unetched. 900× Fig. 9 Titanium nitrides (E) in UNS G10600...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002116
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... of cutting forces and tool wear were made for certain materials. Clearly such efforts are extremely helpful in understanding how the process behaves. However, the theory of plastic deformation of metals (dislocation theory) has not yet been able to predict values for shear stresses and tool/chip interface...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002193
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... that occurs in turning porous iron materials when solid oxides are present at the tool/chip interface has been described ( Ref 12 ). Oxide-reduced powders usually contain residual internal oxide inclusions, which, if sufficiently hard, can be detrimental to machinability. Any variation in oxygen, nitrogen...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002120
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... velocity is the relative velocity between the chip and the rake surface of the tool. The magnitude of these two velocities and the related shear stresses at these interfaces determine the amount of thermal energy released per unit of contact area. The magnitude of the shear velocity causes a high strain...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006103
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... interface, chip formation, lubrication of the tool-chip interface, and prevention of adhesion between the tool and chips ( Fig. 7 ). Fig. 7 A complex PM composite microstructure used for demanding valve seat insert (VSI) applications. Courtesy of Federal-Mogul Several materials including...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006306
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
.... A scanning electron microscope was used to examine a GI after QSD machining. A complex structure of MAZ was found ahead of, and underneath, the cutting tool ( Ref 3 ). In the GI casting, graphite flakes were present at the cutting tool/chip interface. The graphite flakes play a major role in decreasing...
Book Chapter

Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002172
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... be critical. The evidence indicates that the chip/tool interface temperature increases with speed, approaching the melting point of the work material ( Fig. 9 ), rather than falling off at very high speeds, as had been claimed by Salomon ( Ref 36 ). Because the melting temperature of aluminum alloys is low...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003189
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... tool life at higher speeds than flood cooling does). High-pressure systems are sometimes used for other operations. The high pressure facilitates the fluid reaching the chip-tool interface. In grinding, a high-pressure jet also serves to clean the wheel. Cutting fluids can also be applied...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002128
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... functions: Cooling the tool, workpiece, and chip Lubricating (reducing friction and minimizing erosion on the tool) Controlling built-up edge on the tool Flushing away chips Protecting the workpiece tooling and machine from corrosion The relative importance of each of these functions...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002151
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... Abstract Metal is removed from the workpiece by the mechanical action of irregularly shaped abrasive grains in all grinding operations. This article discusses three primary components of grinding wheels, namely, abrasive (the cutting tool), bond (the tool holder), and porosity or air for chip...
Book Chapter

By K. Subramanian
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002152
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... illustrating interactions in the grinding zone of a grinding wheel/workpiece interface. 1, abrasive/work interface; 2, chip/bond interface; 3, chip/work interface; 4, bond/work interface Machine tool developments in the past 20 years have contributed to innovative superabrasive applications. Precision...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002124
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
..., and severe frictional conditions at the interfaces of the tool, chip, and workpiece. Most of the work of plastic deformation and friction is converted into heat. In cutting, about 80% of this heat leaves with the chip, but the other 20% remains at the tool tip, producing high temperatures (≥1000 °C, or 1800...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001104
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
..., high temperatures, and severe frictional conditions at the interfaces of the tool, chip, and workpiece. Most of the work of plastic deformation and friction is converted into heat. In cutting, about 80% of this heat leaves with the chip, but the other 20% remains at the tool tip, producing high...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.a0005537
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
... temperatures on the tool and workpiece), the surface residual stresses were observed to increase and become more tensile. Increased chip loads (feeds) were observed to have a pronounced effect on subsurface stresses. With increased chip loads, subsurface stresses (below peak compressive zone of stresses) were...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001320
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... temperatures (∼1050 °C, or 1920 °F) may induce stresses and a subsequent decrease in coating adhesion. Coating morphology can also affect surface roughness, which in turn may increase the frictional forces and generate heat at the chip-tool interface. It is known that the relatively smoother PVD TiN-coated...