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titanium-zirconium-molybdenum alloys

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003994
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... atmosphere. The largest TZM (titanium, zirconium, molybdenum) forgings are made using pressed-and-sintered billets and upset forging them on large hydraulic presses with flat dies. These forgings themselves become forging dies for isothermal forging of superalloy turbine discs. Figure 1 illustrates an...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003142
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... noble metals such as platinum, palladium, and rhodium. The second includes nickel, molybdenum, and tungsten. The third group includes zirconium, tantalum, chromium, and possibly molybdenum. Considerable work has been done on the use of noble metals as alloying additions in titanium. An outgrowth of this...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003823
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... for iron-, copper-, magnesium-, aluminum-, molybdenum- and titanium-base alloys. Zirconium is useful as a getter because of its ability to combine with gases at elevated temperatures. Along with niobium, zirconium is superconductive at low temperatures and is used to make superconductive magnets. In...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003140
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... classes denote the general type of microstructure after processing. Most α alloys will have a minimal amount of β phase, sometimes as a result of tramp iron, as in commercially pure titanium, and sometimes due to minor β stabilizer additions to enhance workability (e.g., the molybdenum and vanadium...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006253
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... (high solubility) can be expected when the diameter of the alloying element does not differ more than 15% from that of the parent metal. Manganese, iron, vanadium, molybdenum, aluminum, tin, and zirconium are some important alloying elements used in titanium alloys. Because many common elements fall in...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004007
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... change in residual stresses in the workpiece produced by the small second reduction ( Ref 85 ). This method has been successfully applied to the extrusion of some brittle and semibrittle materials, including beryllium and TZM molybdenum (titanium, zirconium, molybdenum) alloy, using...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003826
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... hafnium-tantalum alloys hafnium-zirconium alloys hydrochloric acid mechanical properties nitric acid physical properties pitting corrosion sulfuric acid water alkalis HAFNIUM is element number 72. It resides in group IVA of the periodic table with titanium and zirconium. Hafnium is always...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003822
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... Abstract Titanium alloys are often used in highly corrosive environments because they are better suited than most other materials. The excellent corrosion resistance is the result of naturally occurring surface oxide films that are stable, uniform, and adherent. This article offers explanations...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006267
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... systems, cobalt, tungsten, and molybdenum replace some of the chromium in the carbide phases. Niobium and tantalum (8 to 10%) and titanium and zirconium (less than 0.5%) form carbides of the MC type. Molybdenum and tungsten form M 6 C in the Co-Cr-C alloys when the content of either element is great...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005674
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
..., polymethyl methacrylate, TNZT, titanium-niobium-zicronium-tantalum. Source: Ref 14 The principal alloying elements in beta alloys are niobium, zirconium, molybdenum, tantalum, and iron, all of which exhibit good to excellent biocompatibility. A typical β-type titanium alloy developed for biomedical...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003151
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... are zirconium, titanium, hafnium, tantalum, and tungsten. Alloy C-103 (Nb-10Hf-1Ti-0.7Zr) has been widely used for rocket components that require moderate strength at about 1095 to 1370 °C (2000 to 2500 °F). Alloy Nb-1Zr is used in nuclear applications because it has a low thermal neutron...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001311
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... of the metal after conversion coating and lubricating with one part of molybdenum disulfide and two parts of thermosetting eponphenolic resin. Table 6 Comparison of conversion coatings used with various lubricants in wiredrawing of titanium Coating Drawing compound Total reduction, % No...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001313
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... Oxide coatings for molybdenum Type Deposition process Thickness range μm mils Zirconium oxide-glass Frit, enamel 130–760 5–30 Chromium-glass Frit, enamel 130–250 5–10 Chromium-alumina oxide Thermal spray over chromium plate 200–380 8–15 Alumina oxide Thermal spray 25...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006270
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
..., molybdenum, niobium) in larger amounts than in near-alpha alloys. Tin and zirconium, which have relatively small effects on the transformation temperature, are added to increase the strength of titanium alloys by solid-solution hardening. Minimum tensile strength and compositions of some selected alpha-beta...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... Abstract This article reviews the bulk deformation processes for various aluminide and silicide intermetallic alloys with emphasis on the gamma titanium aluminide alloys. It summarizes the understanding of microstructure evolution and fracture behavior during thermomechanical processing of the...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005442
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... Abstract This article contains a table that lists the density of metals and alloys. It presents information on aluminum, copper, iron, lead, magnesium, nickel, tin, titanium, and zinc, an their respective alloys. Information on wrought alloys, permanent magnet materials, precious metals, and...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006283
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... and β stabilizers Alloying element Approximate range, wt% Effect on structure Aluminum 3–8 α stabilizer Tin 2–4 α stabilizer Vanadium 2–15 β stabilizer Molybdenum 2–15 β stabilizer Chromium 2–12 β stabilizer Copper ~2 β stabilizer Zirconium 2–5 α and β...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0006543
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... 0.314 V-36 … 8.60 0.311 HS-25 … 9.13 0.330 HS-36 … 9.04 0.327 HS-31 … 8.61 0.311 HS-21 … 8.30 0.300 Molybdenum-base alloy Mo-0.5Ti … 10.2 0.368 Lead and lead alloys Chemical lead (99.90+%Pb) … 11.34 0.4097 Corroding lead (99.73+%Pb) … 11.36...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003145
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... alloys, type metals, copper alloys, dental alloys, cast irons, titanium alloys, and zirconium alloys. Finally, it presents a short note on the applications of tin powder and corrosion resistance of tin. applications of tin powder corrosion resistance electroplating hot dip coatings production...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003175
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... “Magnesium and Magnesium Alloys” in this Handbook. The AZ family of alloys is grain refined by the addition of pellets of hexachlorethane to the melt before pouring. The zirconium content of Mg-Zr alloys acts as its own grain refiner. All production titanium castings to...