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tissue response

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005682
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... responses to the biomaterial. It discusses the testing methods of implant failure, such as in vitro and in vivo assessment of tissue compatibility. biomaterials biomedical devices cardiovascular applications ceramic implants dental applications functionally-graded hip implant implant failure...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005675
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... in physical properties, and relates the properties and hard-tissue response to particular clinical applications. The article also provides information on the glass or glass-ceramic particles used in cancer treatments. bioactive glasses biocompatibility calcium phosphate ceramics cancer treatments...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004205
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... or interruption of the passive layer removes the corrosion protection, at least temporarily, and leads to increased corrosion. The usual response to the presence of metallic materials in living tissue is the production of a fibrous tissue capsule that surrounds the implant and provides a partial barrier...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005652
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... release metal ions into the surrounding tissue, and the tissues must then respond in some fashion. In general, the response is relatively innocuous, and the metals are said to be biocompatible. Biocompatibility of Metals and Metal Alloys As surgery to repair anatomical structures and replace...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005659
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
.... biocompatibility ceramics medical implants metals nonresorbable polymers polymers resorbable polymers ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene IDEALLY, THE DESIGN AND MATERIALS of which an implant is fabricated should accomplish the defined clinical objective. The local tissue response should produce...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005655
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... their knowledge and understanding of the range of tissue responses to implanted bioceramics, they have been increasingly able to control the desired tissue response. Categories of Bioceramics Bioceramics may be categorized by the surrounding host tissue reaction to the implant: Bioinert ceramics...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005660
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... Abstract The biocompatibility of a material relates to its immunological response, toxicity profile, and ability to integrate with surrounding tissue without undesirable local or systemic effects on a patient. This article underscores the transformation of the medical device design ecosystem...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005666
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... of round particles to fibers (i.e., increasing ratio of length/width, called the aspect ratio) that an elevated inflammatory response is generally triggered. Currently, more reactive particle fibers have an aspect ratio greater than three, although few particles found in tissues retrieved during implant...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005667
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... example where a polymer degrades, the breakdown products must be tested to ensure they are being excreted rather than accumulating remotely in the host tissue. In addition, of particular concern are immunotoxicity issues, where a chronic long-term immune response to a material or device could result...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006892
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... are inevitably in contact with the human body, they must be biocompatible. Biocompatibility is the ability of a material to perform with an appropriate host response in a specific biomedical application. Biomaterials are expected to coexist with host tissues in the body and provide targeted function(s) without...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006853
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... and Their Effect on Bacterial Adhesion , J. Dent. , Vol 40 , 2012 , p 146 – 153 10.1016/j.jdent.2011.12.006 22. Kajiwara N. et al. , Soft Tissue Biological Response to Zirconia and Metal Implant Abutments Compared with Natural Tooth: Microcirculation Monitoring as a Novel Bioindicator...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006404
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... of UHMWPE and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) (used as cement for the stem of the implant inside the bone) provokes an inflammatory response that damages the surrounding tissue and causes aseptic loosening of the orthopaedic implant. Wear particles from PMMA (approximately 0.8 to 1 μm, or 0.0003 to 0.0004...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006894
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... implantation can absorb fluid from the surrounding tissues and may compromise the tissue homeostasis. For this reason, it is important to evaluate the host response to scaffolds, because this may compromise the integrity of the scaffold or its deformation, thus affecting its functionality ( Ref 34...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006893
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... engineering that needs inclusion of small pores for an improved tissue response ( Ref 44 - 46 ). However, this can still be applied to hard tissues with pore size larger than 10 mm (0.39 in.) ( Ref 45 , 47 ). The extrusion pressure may affect cell viability, potentially alter cell morphology, and also...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005674
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
.... Moreover, it was observed that bone grew into contact with titanium. By the early 1950s, the potential of titanium for medical applications was being recognized due to its superior strength, low density, corrosion resistance, acceptance by bone and soft tissue, and tendency to increasingly “adhere to bone...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006855
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... to soft tissues, alginate/gelatin hydrogels can also be used in hard (bone) tissue research. For example, Zehnder et al. ( Ref 26 ) developed a co-culture system with ADA/gelatin using bioprinting for osteoblastic (ST2) and osteoclastic (RAW) progenitor cells, the two cell types responsible for the bone...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006854
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... Abstract Due to its layer-by-layer process, 3D printing enables the formation of complex geometries using multiple materials. Three-dimensional printing for bone tissue engineering is called bioprinting and refers to the use of material-transfer processes for patterning and assembling...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006890
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... Abstract Bioprinting has been advancing in the field of tissue engineering as the process for fabricating scaffolds, making use of additive manufacturing technologies. In situ bioprinting (also termed intraoperative bioprinting) is a promising solution to address the limitations of conventional...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006860
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... of living cells has been used to create an innovative ex vivo experimental platform to study cancer cell dynamics by printing MDA-MB-231 cancer cells onto rat mesenteric tissues ( Ref 31 ). The LIFT printing platform has enabled the study of tissue response in terms of the angiogenic network growth...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006859
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... is safety ( Ref 2 ). Biocompatibility is an aspect of safety and is especially important for all implantable biomedical devices. Biocompatibility is the interaction between a biomedical device and the host tissue without eliciting a detrimental response in the body. It includes assessments of the mechanical...