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tangential stress

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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 29 Calculated development of tangential stress and austenite fraction vs. time at the surface of a cylinder being induction hardened using two frequencies simultaneously: 12 and 325 kHz. Heating time = 0.4864 s. Source: Ref 74 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 36 Maximum shear stress planes for radial and tangential stresses created by necking. Source: Ref 54 More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 36 Maximum shear-stress planes for radial and tangential stresses created by necking. Source: Ref 55 More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 30 Experimental and numerical results for the tangential residual stress depth distribution after dual-frequency induction hardening of cylindrical specimens of AISI 4140 (German grade 42CrMo4), when using (a) the model incorporating a constant value of K (standard model) and the model More
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Published: 01 February 2024
Fig. 12 Tangential residual stress versus distance from the surface of C22 steel cylinders with different case-hardening depths. Source: Ref 45 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 41 Comparison between measured and predicted tangential surface stress. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
M s at the center but below M s at the surface. σ z , axial stress; σ θ , tangential stress. Source: Ref 80 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
tangential stress versus bearing DN . Source: Ref 10 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003387
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... be cognizant of cases where primary loads in the plane of the laminate induce secondary loads that act in the through-thickness direction. Such cases include free-edge stresses in cross-plied laminates under axial loads, radial stresses in curved laminates subject to tangential loads and bending moments...
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Published: 01 February 2024
Fig. 13 Tangential residual stresses of a carburized cylinder quenched from 927 °C (1700 °F) in oil at 20 °C (68 °F). Source: Ref 45 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003262
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... tangential stress field. Accordingly, all fibers below the neutral axis r ≤ R n have been progressively compressed, while those situated above R c have been consistently stretched during deformation. All fibers in the interval R n ≤ r < R c have been overtaken by the neutral axis. Fibers...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005161
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... and is experiencing unloading from a compressive tangential stress field. Accordingly, all fibers below the neutral axis r ≤ R n have been progressively compressed, while those situated above R c have been consistently stretched during deformation. All fibers in the interval R n ≤ r < R c have been...
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Published: 01 February 2024
Fig. 11 Effect of agitation methods on surface residual stresses of JIS S45C steel. Quenchant: 30 °C (86 °F) 10% polymer (PAG). Agitation methods: still, 0.3 m/s upward flow, and 0.7 m/s upward flow in immersion quenching. (a) Axial residual stress on surface; (b) tangential residual stress More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 22 Comparison of results for determining plastic bending in a plate. (a) Distribution of tangential and radial stresses for a 25 mm (1 in.) thick plate bent to R i =100 mm (4 in.). (b) Stress-strain diagrams used in the analyses for (a) More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 10 Comparison of results for determining plastic bending in a plate. (a) Distribution of tangential and radial stresses for a 25 mm (1 in.) thick plate bent to R i = 100 mm (4 in.). (b) Stress-strain diagrams used in the analyses for (a) More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 83 Method of heating high-carbon-chromium steel ingots and the calculated corresponding values of thermal stresses and plastic strain in the core. (Subscripts r, t, and z are radial, tangential, and axial stresses and strains, respectively.) Source: Ref 178 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 82 Three typical theoretical examples of thermal stresses and plastic strains in ingot cores during the heating process of high-carbon-chromium steel ingots during heating. (Subscripts r, t, and z are radial, tangential, and axial stresses and strains, respectively.) Source: Ref 178 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 45 (a) Variation of the heat-transfer coefficient. Source: Ref 99 . (b) Simulated residual stresses using a constant heat-transfer coefficient of 4000 W/m 2 K, a heat-transfer coefficient varying with time (c2, Table 1 ) or with temperature (a). Radial (i) and tangential (ii) stresses More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 2 Variations in maximum shear stress as a function of depth for three different friction coefficients; (a) μ ≈ 0, (b) 0 ≤ μ ≤ 0.11, and (c) μ ≥ 0.11. This figure is for static loading, but the range of shear stress versus depth is also at or very near the surface for tangential forces More
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Published: 01 January 1996
of a point contact. At different depths below the contact surface, the variation of shear stresses will be similar, but of different magnitude for pure rolling. When sliding is superimposed with the rolling, the tangential friction forces at the surface modify the range of shear stresses from the pure More