1-20 of 514 Search Results for

surface induction hardening

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005761
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... a workpiece is explained, with emphasis on the skin effect. The article discusses typical procedures for induction hardening of steel, namely, austenitizing and quenching to form martensite either on the surface (case hardening) or through the entire section (through hardening). It briefly describes...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005867
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... gear, and as a result, it can be done precisely and repeatedly such that post-heat-treating machining and grinding are rarely needed. Another goal of induction gear hardening is to produce significant compressive residual stresses at the surface and in a subsurface region. Compressive stresses help...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005865
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
.... 12 Example of machine for nonrotational surface hardening of crankshaft journals. Courtesy of Inductoheat Inc. Fig. 13 Inductor sections and assembly for nonrotational induction hardening of crankshaft journals. (a) The inductor is machined from a copper block and consists of two sections...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005869
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... Abstract Induction hardening of geared parts used in aeronautic and aerospace industry is an important technology because of its one-piece flow, repeatability, energy efficiency, and tighter control of surface distortion than conventional carburizing. This article describes the requirements and...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005863
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... power for induction hardening, and describes common methods for measuring case depth, such as optical and microhardness, and surface hardness. It provides information on some complications and ambiguities associated with these measurements. The article also discusses the commonly used non-destructive...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005864
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... quality of induction-hardened axle shafts. axle shafts bend strength carbon content case depth induction hardening torsional strength Axle shafts are ideally suited to case hardening, or surface hardening by induction. Although induction heating has the capability to through...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005859
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... of the particular steel alloy and initial microstructure depending on a variety of parameters including component size, cost, required surface and core mechanical properties, and so forth. Typically, induction-hardening grades contain at least 0.3 wt% C to ensure sufficient carbon is in solution in...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005868
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... 10V45 bar. Hardness: HRC 59. Portions of bar with a more effective quench showed HRC 61 at a similar depth. Fig. 16 Overtempered martensite on the surface of a 10V45 bar, indicating premature quenching Fig. 17 Induction-hardened steel bar macroetched to show spiral band of...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005771
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... of the surface. The more common methods currently used to harden the surface of steels include flame and induction hardening. However, each of these methods has shortcomings that can prevent its use in some applications. For example, the disadvantages of flame hardening include the possibility of...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005817
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... ≤0.1 ≤0.4 … (a) DIN, Deutsche Industrie-Normen For volume hardening and other thermal surface-hardening processes (such as flame hardening and induction hardening), the choice of the right quenching medium is of crucial importance for the hardening process results. For EBH, the quenching...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005808
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... Abstract Laser surface hardening is a noncontact process that provides a chemically inert and clean environment as well as flexible integration with operating systems. This article provides a brief discussion on the various conventional surface-modification techniques to enhance the surface and...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005882
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... kW/m 2 · K Fig. 50 Predicted residual hoop stress for induction hardened cylinder in Fig. 48 for different spray quench intensities. Fig. 45 (a), Temperature (b), martensite fraction and (c) hoop stress histories at the surface for DANTE modeled cylinder in Fig. 37 for...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005870
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... some cases, effects on residual stress. fatigue strength hardness induction hardening quenching residual stress steel Induction surface hardening is particularly suitable for axisymmetric or near-axisymmetric machine parts in steel or cast iron. There are two...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005842
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... on. Fig. 2 Multiturn solenoid coils (cylindrical and rectangular) are used in the great majority of induction through-heating applications In induction selective hardening (for example, surface, edge, or band hardening) and joining (brazing, soldering, bonding, for example), the situation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005871
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... on the hardenability of the steel and the cross-sectional size of the component, the microstructure may change from the surface to the center of the part. The response of the quenched and tempered microstructure to induction hardening is the best that can be expected. For a given set of induction...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005873
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... great majority of simplified ballpark-estimation techniques have many restrictions, making it difficult to obtain design details and process subtleties. This is true not only for through-hardened parts but, to an even greater degree, for induction-surface-hardened components. Advanced numerical...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005862
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... much greater than, the residual stress due to the quenching process. Another factor is the depth of the surface hardened layer. Figure 7 shows the magnitude of compressive residual stress at the surface of an induction hardened steel bar increases with increasing case depth. This increase is balanced...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005897
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... not only for applications related to induction heating of the entire workpiece but, to an even greater degree, for selective heating by induction (e.g., surface hardening). Advanced numerical simulation software based on tightly coupled electromagnetic and thermal phenomena enable induction heating...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.a0005533
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
... austenite, and then rapidly cooling it to below the M s temperature, where the martensitic transformation begins. The first step in designing an induction hardening machine is to specify the required hardness pattern, including surface hardness, case depth, and transition zone. The hardness pattern is...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005835
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... quenching in induction hardening (spray quenching and submerged quenching). Heat exchangers and cooling stations. Air-cooling of busses and other components (e.g., enclosures and cabinets). Heat convection represents heat transfer from the surface of the heated workpiece to surrounding gas (e.g...