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superplastic forming

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005147
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... Abstract This article discusses many of the processes and related considerations involved in the forming of superplastic sheet metal parts. It reviews the requirements for superplasticity and describes the characteristics of superplastic metals. The characterization of superplastic behavior...
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 9 Schematic of the blow forming technique for superplastic forming More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 8 Superplastic forming of titanium. (a) Setup at the start of the forming cycle. (b) After forming is completed More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 49 Schematic of the blow forming technique for superplastic forming More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 6 Use of aluminum-lithium alloys and superplastic-forming (SPF) aluminum-lithium alloys in a fighter aircraft More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 1 Superplastic forming/diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) of titanium sheet. (a) Sequence of operations required to join three sheets of superplastic titanium alloy using the SPF/DB process. (b) Typical three-sheet titanium alloy component superplastically formed following diffusion bonding More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 15 Die apparatus for providing back pressure during superplastic forming to suppress cavitation. P 1 , forming pressure; P 2 , back pressure. Source: Ref 21 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 16 Example of cost and weight savings obtainable using superplastic forming in the aircraft industry. Conventionally fabricated part (a) had 15 pieces and required 212 fasteners; the superplastically formed part (b) consists of 3 parts and requires 45 fasteners. This results in a 56% cost More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 12 Examples of thermoforming methods used for superplastic forming. (a) Plug-assisted forming into a female die cavity. (b) Snap-back forming over a male die that is moved up into the sheet More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 15 Cross section of the superplastic forming (SPF) process combined with diffusion bonding (SPF/DB). The process shown uses preplaced details to which the superplastic sheet is bonded. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 18 Example of a four-sheet superplastic forming/diffusion bonding process in which the outer sheets are formed first and the center sheets are then formed and bonded to the outer two sheets More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 9 Loading a sheet of titanium into a superplastic forming die More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 10 Schematic showing the sequence of operations for superplastic forming/diffusion bonding of three-sheet titanium parts More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 51 Examples of thermoforming methods used for superplastic forming. (a) Plug-assisted forming into a female die cavity. (b) Snap-back forming over a male die that is moved up into the sheet More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Superplastic forming/diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) of titanium sheet. (a) Sequence of operations required to join three sheets of superplastic titanium alloy using SPF/DB process. (b) Typical three-sheet titanium alloy component superplastically formed following diffusion bonding. More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 19 Deformation mechanism map of aluminum alloy 5083 with superplastic forming, quick plastic forming, and hot stamping. GBS = grain boundary sliding, SD = slip deformation, PLB = persistent Lüders, or slip, bands. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 9 Double-well pan superplastically formed using aluminum alloy 7475 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 17 Alloy 718 (UNS N07719) perforated sheet superplastically formed for an aircraft gas turbine tail cone skin. Courtesy of Special Metals Corporation More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 27 Thinning development in a 1.37 mm (0.054 in.) thick superplastic formed Ti-6Al-4V part having a rectangular cross section and semi-infinite length. Formed at 870 °C (1600 °F) using a boron nitride lubricant, the sheet required 20 min to fabricate at an average strain rate of 5.8×10 −4 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 48 Aft closure, for a guided missile, that was superplastically formed at 815 °C (1500 °F) from a 1.6% C ultrahigh-carbon steel. The processing procedure consisted of warm pressing (800 °C, or 1470 °F) liquid-atomized powders into a billet and forging the resulting billet into plate More