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superlubricity

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006387
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... product. The financial benefit of attaining superlubricity or near-zero friction in mechanical systems is enormous. Superlubricity (μ < 0.01) not only can reduce the consumption of friction energy but also can provide a near wearless condition. Recently, Li et al. found that a phosphoric acid solution...
Book Chapter

By Koji Kato
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006394
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... wear modes cutting plastic flow plowing polishing wear polyethylene polyoxymethylene superlow friction superlubricity surface smoothing wear control wedge forming THE TERM POLISHING WEAR is used to describe the type of wear that produces a mirrorlike, smooth finish on at least one...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006434
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... orientation parallel to the surface, and atomic incommensurability between the layers on opposing surfaces where sliding occurs. In the case of pristine materials and environments, friction coefficients can be so low that they are classified as exhibiting “superlubricity” with coefficient of friction µ...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006360
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... friction in dry or inert conditions. As humidity is increased, both nonhydrogenated and hydrogenated DLC films tend to settle in to a friction coefficient range around 0.1 to 0.3. “Superlubricity” has been observed for highly hydrogenated DLC coatings with sliding friction coefficients less than 0.01...