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submerged arc welding

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005566
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract Submerged arc welding (SAW) is suited for applications involving long, continuous welds. This article describes the operating principle, application, advantages, limitations, power source, equipment, and fluxes in SAW. It reviews three different types of electrodes manufactured for SAW...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001359
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Submerged arc welding (SAW) is an arc welding process in which the arc is concealed by a blanket of granular and fusible flux. This article provides a schematic illustration of a typical setup for automatic SAW and discusses the advantages and limitations and the process applications...
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 25 Recommended proportions of grooves for joints made by submerged arc welding More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 4 Typical submerged arc welding positions More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 5 Submerged arc welding buildup on cylindrical object More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 7 Typical submerged arc welding equipment layout. CTWD, contact-tip-to-work distance More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 9 Schematic illustration of the submerged arc welding process used for heavy deposition in plane (i.e., down-hand) only. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 31 Submerged arc welding process More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 21 Current (DCEP) versus wire feed speed for submerged arc welding with E3XX stainless steel electrodes. Source: Ref 27 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 22 Butt joint designs for submerged arc welding. Source: Ref 26 More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 18 Snap coupler in which submerged arc welding was used to join malleable iron to forged steel. Dimensions given in inches. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 6 Submerged arc welding process More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 11 Large piston assembled by submerged arc welding (SAW). Low-carbon steel base metal; low-carbon steel filler metal (EL12). Source: Ref 15 Conditions for SAW Joint type Circumferential butt Weld type Single-U-groove, integral backing Joint preparation Machining More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 13 Submerged arc welding (SAW) setup for heat-exchanger header. Carbon steel, 0.35% max C (ASTM A 515, grade 70) base metal; carbon steel filler metals. FCAW, flux cored arc welding. Source: Ref 15 Original design Improved design Welding process Manual FCAW Automatic SAW More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 17 Submerged arc welding setup for steam-drum shell course. Based metal: carbon steel, 0.35% max C (ASTM A 515, grade 70), normalized. Filler metals: low-carbon steel (E7018) for root passes (shielded metal arc welding); 0.5% Mo steel for remaining passes (submerged arc welding). Source More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Schematic showing key components of automatic submerged arc welding setup More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 47 Microstructure of the second weld bead of a submerged-arc weld joint in 200 mm ( 3 4 in.) duplex stainless steel plate. The extremely fine austenite precipitate was formed as a result of reheating from the subsequent weld pass, which used an arc energy of 6 kJ/mm (150 kJ More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 2 Schematic showing typical weld pool dynamics of a submerged arc weld More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 7 Toe cracks in the HAZ of a double-submerged arc weld. More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 1 Schematic of a typical submerged arc weld More