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stud arc welding

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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005555
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract This article serves as a basic information source for those interested in accomplishing one-sided, no-hole attachment of metal fasteners. The stud arc-welding process is a substitute for fastening procedures such as drilling and tapping, bolting, and self-tapping screws. The article...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001360
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Stud arc welding (SW), also known as arc stud welding, is a commonly used method for joining a metal stud, or fastener, to a metal workpiece. This article serves as a basic information source for those interested in accomplishing one-sided, no-hole attachment of metal fasteners...
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 6 Common stud configurations for stud arc welding More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 6 Common stud configurations for stud arc welding More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 12 Welding through a template using a ferrule with stud arc welding fasteners More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 13 Portable stud arc welding gun equipped with accessories for welding studs through or into a drilled or formed hole More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 12 Welding through a template using a ferrule with stud arc welding fasteners More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 13 Portable stud arc welding gun equipped with accessories for welding studs through or into a drilled or formed hole More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 1 Stud arc welding control system. The control system must be connected to a direct current power source for welding. In most applications, the stud (electrode) should be negative. More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 2 Typical integrated power/control system for stud arc welding More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 3 Typical standard-duty gun for stud arc welding More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 4 Stud arc welding process. (a) Gun is properly positioned. (b) Trigger is depressed and stud is lifted, creating an arc. (c) Arcing period is completed and stud is plunged into molten pool of metal on base material. (d) Gun is withdrawn from welded stud and ferrule is removed. More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 23 Stud arc welding process. (a) Gun is properly positioned. (b) Trigger is depressed and stud is lifted, creating an arc. (c) Arcing period is completed, and stud is plunged into molten pool of metal on base material. (d) Gun is withdrawn from welded stud, and ferrule is removed. More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Stud arc welding control system. The control system must be connected to a dc power source for welding. In most applications, the stud (electrode) should be negative. More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 2 Typical integrated power/control system for stud arc welding More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 3 Typical standard-duty gun for stud arc welding More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 4 Stud arc welding process. (a) Gun is properly positioned. (b) Trigger is depressed and stud is lifted, creating an arc. (c) Arcing period is completed and stud is plunged into molten pool of metal on base material. (d) Gun is withdrawn from welded stud and ferrule is removed. More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 9 Common methods for accommodating weld flash (fillet) with stud arc welds. Typical dimensions for A, B, and C are given in Table 4 . More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 16 Typical offset assembly used when stud arc welded fasteners must be welded below an obstruction More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 21 Stud arc weld characteristics for satisfactory and unsatisfactory welds. (a) Satisfactory; good flash formation, wetting entire periphery of stud base. (b) Unsatisfactory; plunge too short, not enough material allowed for burn-off. Stud must project an adequate length beyond More