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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005122
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
...Abstract Abstract Stretch forming is the forming of sheet, bars, and rolled or extruded sections over a die or form block of the required shape while the workpiece is held in tension. This article discusses the applicability, advantages, and machines and accessories of stretch forming...
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 57 Two operations that simulate stamping: (a) deep drawing and (b) stretching More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 10 Typical stretch-formed shapes. (a) Longitudinal stretching. (b) Transverse stretching. (c) Compound bend from extrusion. (d) Long, sweeping bend from extrusion. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 7 Maximum stretching height ( h max ) for different sheet materials and temperatures. s 0 , initial sheet thickness. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 13 Schematic of Marciniak biaxial stretching test More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 15 Stretching and drawing. (a) Stretch forming. (b) Deep drawing. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 8 Combined stretching/drawing of an irregular part with (a) draw bead and (b) edge bead More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 14 The influence of post stretching on the fatigue properties of 3/2 ARALL-2 laminates under typical fuselage fatigue loading. Source: Ref 27 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 6 Strain distribution for section formed by (a) stretching and (b) bending. Draw bending, compression bending, press bending, and roll bending compress the metal in various sections of the bend. Stretch bending imparts elongation throughout the bend and thus minimizes springback. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 55 Deformation areas. (a) Stretching as punch contacts blank. (b) Bending and unbending over die radius. (c) Local thinning produced by stretching and bending More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 10 Effect of physical stretching on root fusion. (a) Original oxide surfaces. (b) Incomplete (poor) root fusion. (c) Complete (proper) root fusion More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Wire-stretching jaws that broke because of shrinkage porosity and low ductility of case and core. The jaws, sand cast from low-alloy steel, were used to stretch wire for prestressed concrete beams. (a) Two pairs of movable jaws. 0.7×. (b) Two pairs of stationary jaws. 0.7×. (c) and (d More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 15 Microstructures of alloy 5083-O plate stretched 1%. (a) As-stretched. (b) After heating 40 days at 120 °C (250 °F) More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005149
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... of measuring deformation. It reviews the effect of materials properties and temperature on formability. The article provides a detailed discussion on the two major categories of formability tests such as the intrinsic test, including uniaxial tension testing, plane-strain tension testing, biaxial stretch...
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 6 Factors affecting deformation and failure during stretch flanging of tailor-welded blanks More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 27 Long narrow strut with a contoured stretch flange that was made by rubber-pad forming in a curved die with cover plates to prevent springback. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 32 Airfoil on which the leading edge was stretch formed to a long convex shape without lubricant in a radial-draw former More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 33 Channel section that was stretch formed from a preform produced in a press brake, and details of tooling used in stretch forming, which provided reverse twist to compensate for springback. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 16 Stretch-forming characteristics of 1.0 mm (0.040 in.) thick copper alloys. Elongation values for a given percentage of cold reduction indicate the remaining capacity for stretch forming in a single operation. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 8 Stretch-formed specimen. Material: MgAl3Zn1 (AZ31); initial sheet thickness, s 0 : 1.3 mm (0.051 in.); forming temperature: 250 °C (480 °F). Source: Ref 15 More