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Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003545
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... Abstract This article reviews the applied aspects of creep and stress-rupture failures. It discusses the microstructural changes and bulk mechanical behavior of classical and nonclassical creep behavior. The article provides a description of microstructural changes and damage from creep...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006780
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... Abstract The principal types of elevated-temperature mechanical failure are creep and stress rupture, stress relaxation, low- and high-cycle fatigue, thermal fatigue, tension overload, and combinations of these, as modified by environment. This article briefly reviews the applied aspects...
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 17 Effect of notch on stress-rupture behavior. Stress-rupture behavior of smooth ( K = 1.0) and notched specimens of AISI 603 steel tested at 595 °C (1100 °F). All specimens were normalized at 980 °C (1800 °F) and tempered 6 h at 675 °C (1250 °F). Source: Ref 27 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 15 Effect of notch on stress-rupture behavior. Stress-rupture behavior of smooth ( K = 1.0) and notched specimens of Fe-0.27C-0.75Mn-0.65Si-1.25Cr-0.50Mo-0.85V steel tested at 595 °C (1100 °F). All specimens were normalized at 980 °C (1800 °F) and tempered at 6 h at 675 °C (1250 °F) More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Logarithmic plot of stress-rupture stress versus rupture life for Co-Cr-Ni-base alloy S-590. The significance of inflection points A, B, N, O, and Y is explained in the text. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 12 Logarithmic plot of stress-rupture stress versus rupture life for nickel-base alloy U-700 at 815 °C (1500 °F). The increasing slope of the curve to the right of the sigma break is caused by sigma-phase formation. More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 7 Logarithmic plot of stress-rupture stress versus rupture life for Co-Cr-Ni-base alloy S-590. The significance of inflection points A , B , N , O , and Y is explained in the text. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 15 Logarithmic plot of stress-rupture stress versus rupture life for nickel-base alloy U-700 at 815 °C (1500 °F). The increasing slope of the curve to the right of the sigma break is caused by sigma-phase formation. More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 4 Stress-rupture curves for a 1000 h rupture life of selected nickel-base cast superalloys More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 62 Stress-rupture life of magnesium as a function of stress and temperature. Source: Ref 208 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 10 Stress rupture of heater tube. (a) Heater tube that failed due to stress rupture. (b) and (c) Stress-rupture voids near the fracture. Source Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 17 Stress-rupture behavior of Astroloy. (a) Stress versus time curves. (b) Larson-Miller plot. Source: Ref 69 More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 44 Stress at 0.1% creep strain and stress rupture strength as a function of the Larson-Miller parameter for a 75 mm (3 in.) diameter gray iron rod. Source: Ref 70 More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 13 (a) Heater tube that failed due to stress rupture. (b) and (c) Stress-rupture voids near the fracture. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 123 Stress-rupture behavior of 0.127 mm diam-as-drawn tungsten wire. Source: Ref 520 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 25 Stress-rupture properties of ductile iron: (a) Ferritic (annealed). (b) Pearlitic (normalized). The curve labeled creep shows the stress-temperature combination that will result in a creep rate of 0.0001%/h. Source: Ref 15 , 16 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 26 Stress-rupture properties of 2.5Si-1.0Ni ductile irons. (a) Ferritic. (b) Pearlitic. Source: Ref 15 , 16 More
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