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stress relaxation

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Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003136
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract Copper and copper alloys are used extensively in structural applications in which they are subject to moderately elevated temperatures. At relatively low operating temperatures, these alloys can undergo thermal softening or stress relaxation, which can lead to service failures...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003286
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... Abstract This article provides the theoretical background for understanding many of the physical processes relevant to mechanical testing methods, experimental results, and analytical approaches described in this volume. creep testing stress-relaxation testing creep deformation Stress...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003290
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... Abstract This article discusses stress relaxation testing on metallic materials, as covered by ASTM E 328. It reviews the two types of stress relaxation tests performed in tension, long-term and accelerated testing. The article illustrates load characteristics and data representation for stress...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006934
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... Abstract This article describes the general aspects of creep, stress relaxation, and yielding for homogeneous polymers. It then presents creep failure mechanisms in polymers. The article discusses extrapolative methods for the prediction of long-term creep failure in polymer materials...
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 5 Stress relaxation in C17200 at two levels of initial stress. Data are for beryllium copper (1.9% Be) strip, 0.38 mm (0.015 in.) thick. Open symbols represent initial test stress equal to 80% of the monotonic bending yield stress; solid symbols represent initial stress 50% of the bending More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 2 Typical stress relaxation curves plotted for (a) remaining stress and (b) relaxed stress (the initial stress minus the remaining stress). Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 19 Tensile-stress-relaxation characteristics of C11000. Data are for tinned 30 AWG (0.25 mm or 0.010 in. diameter) annealed electrolytic tough pitch copper wire; initial elastic stress, 89 MPa (13 ksi). Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 30 Residual stress relaxation in Fe 4 N at an isothermal temperature step (holding temperature 350 °C, or 660 °F) during cooling More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 11 Tensile-stress-relaxation characteristics of C11000. Data are for tinned 30 AWG (0.25 mm diam) annealed ETP copper wire; initial elastic stress, 89 MPa (13 ksi). More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 12 Anisotropic stress-relaxation behavior in bending for highly cold-worked C51000 strip. Data are for 5% Sn phosphor bronze cold rolled 93% (reduction in area) to 0.25 mm (0.01 in.) and heat treated 2 h at 260 °C (500 °F). Graphs at left are for stress relaxation transverse More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 13 Anisotropic stress-relaxation behavior in bending for highly cold-worked C72500 strip. Data are for 89Cu-9Ni-2Sn alloy cold rolled 98.7% (reduction in area) to 0.25 mm (0.01 in.) and heat treated 2 h at 375 °C (675 °F). Points represented by circles are for stress relaxation parallel More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 8 Stress relaxation curves for C11000 and similar coppers. Data are for H80 temper wire, 2 mm (0.08 in.) in diameter, and represent the time-temperature combination necessary to produce a 5% reduction in tensile strength. More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 9 Isochronal (1000-h) stress relaxation behavior of selected connector alloys at an initial stress level of 50 to 75% of the room-temperature 0.2% offset yield strength More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 11 Stress relaxation of polyethylene film in tension at ambient temperature. Courtesy of TA Instruments Inc. More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 4 Tensile-stress-relaxation characteristics of C11000. Data are for tinned 30 AWG (0.25 mm diam) annealed ETP copper wire; initial elastic stress, 89 MPa (13 ksi). More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 6 Anisotropic stress-relaxation behavior in bending for highly cold-worked C51000 strip. Data are for 5% Sn phosphor bronze cold rolled 93% (reduction in area) to 0.25 mm (0.01 in.) and heat treated 2 h at 260 °C (500 °F). Graphs at left are for stress relaxation transverse to the rolling More
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 6 Viscoelasticity as shown by the creep and stress relaxation behavior over time More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 5 Stress relaxation predictions in a spinning disk of uniform thickness at elevated temperature. Source: Data from Ref 17 More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 14 Stress relaxation curve for Mobil PS 4600 HIPS More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 31 Torsion creep and stress relaxation of bisphenol A-base polycarbonate, MW = 40,000. Source: Ref 37 More