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steel wire patenting

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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 5 Optical micrographs of 0.70% C steel wire patented at 550 °C (1020 °F) in (a) lead bath and (b) 0.25% carboxymethyl cellulose aqueous solution More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 5 Microstructure of 5.0 mm (0.2 in.) patented high-carbon steel wire in a lead bath at 505 °C (940 °F) using scanning electron microscopy. (a) Very fine pearlite. (b) Fine lamellar cementite More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 13 Microstructure of steel wire fog-cooling patented in a 0.05% carboxymethyl cellulose aqueous solution. Scanning electron microscopy. (a) 3.9 mm (0.15 in.) diameter. (b) 5.0 mm (0.20 in.) diameter. (c) 6.5 mm (0.25 in.) diameter. P L = 0.35 MPa (0.05 ksi); P A = 0.2 MPa (0.03 ksi More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Valve springs made from patented and drawn high-carbon steel wire. Distorted outer spring (left) exhibited about 25% set because of proeutectoid ferrite in the microstructure and high operating temperature. Outer spring (right) is satisfactory. More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 6 Valve springs made from patented and drawn high-carbon steel wire. Distorted outer spring (a) exhibited approximately 25% set because of proeutectoid ferrite in the microstructure and high operating temperature. Outer spring (b) is satisfactory More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005922
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
... Abstract This article focuses on the cooling process and related transformation behavior of steel wires during patenting to identify a physical metallurgical basis for the development of nontoxic alternatives to molten lead for wire patenting. It describes the materials required, the procedures...
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 6 Optical micrographs of lamellar pearlite structure of 5 mm (0.2 in.) steel wire patented at 550 °C (1020 °F) in (a) lead bath and (b) 0.25% carboxymethyl cellulose aqueous solution More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005780
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... Abstract This article, with the aid of illustrations and curves, describes an experiment used to understand the cooling characteristics and transformation behavior of steel wires during patenting. The two aqueous polymer quenchants used as alternatives for lead baths, are carboxymethyl...
Book Chapter

By R.J. Glodowski
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001016
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
..., patenting, and controlled cooling. When the end product must be heat treated, the heat treatment and mechanical properties should be clearly defined. Carbon steel rods are produced in various grades or compositions: low-carbon, medium-low-carbon, medium-high-carbon, and high-carbon steel wire rods. Rod...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005288
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... ). 1964 The Southwire Company of Carrolton, GA, introduced continuous casting of copper wire by the Southwire continuous rod system, using a high-speed casting wheel mold ( Ref 14 ). 1969 Outokumpu O.Y. of Finland introduced and patented the Outokumpu upward casting process for producing copper rod...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05a.a0005713
EISBN: 978-1-62708-171-9
..., spread (if molten), and solidify. The results were coatings that were incrementally formed from impacting droplets. Electric arc spray was also patented by Schoop in approximately 1908, which enabled more metals to be sprayed. Steel, stainless steel, and zinc by wire-arc metallizing advanced through...
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 3 Cooling curve and cooling-rate curve of 5.0 mm (0.2 in.) steel wire during patenting into a molten lead bath at 505 °C (940 °F) More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 13 Time-temperature-transformation diagram for 1080 steel showing difference between conventional and modified austempering. When applied to wire, the modification shown is known as patenting. More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 13 Time-temperature transformation diagram for 1080 steel, showing difference between conventional and modified austempering. When applied to wire, the modification shown is known as patenting. More
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Published: 01 February 2024
Fig. 21 Time-temperature-transformation diagram for 1080 steel showing difference between conventional and modified austempering. When applied to wire, the modification shown is known as patenting. More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 4 Cooling curve and cooling-rate curve of 5 mm (0.2 in.) steel wire during patenting in (a) 0.10% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and (b) 0.25% CMC. Note the different time scales, because cooling was substantially slower in the higher-concentration CMC solution shown in Fig. 4(b) . More
Book Chapter

By Allan B. Dove
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001017
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... treatments for steel wire include stress relief, annealing, normalizing, patenting, and oil tempering. All thermal treatment of ferrous material involves time and temperature to provide the three phases: recovery, recrystallization, and grain growth. Annealing Annealing is the general term applied...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005944
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
...). Below 343 °C, the lead is too “mushy” ( Ref 3 ). Molten lead is used for patenting of steel wire and for austempering. Due to the toxicity and disposal problems with lead, it is seldom used in the thermal processing of steel. However, because lead possesses a high thermal conductivity and no film...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005580
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... or wire that not only conducts the current and sustains the arc but also melts and supplies filler metal to the joint. If the electrode is a carbon or tungsten rod and the joint requires filler-metal addition, that metal is supplied by a separately applied filler-metal rod or wire. However, most welding...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003095
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... drawing soaps, or may be coated in a fashion similar to that used for chemically cleaned rods. Heat Treatments Commonly Applied to Steel Wire Rod Heat treatments commonly applied to steel wire rod, either before or during processing into wire, include annealing, spheroidize annealing, patenting...