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static friction

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006361
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... that should be addressed to ensure that valid data are derived from a friction test. The article presents definitions of terms commonly used in tribology such as static friction, kinetic coefficient of friction, stick-slip behavior, and lubricated friction. It provides information on the precautions that must...
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 1 Inclined plane measurement of the static coefficient of friction (μ s ) More
Image
Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 14 Typical friction coefficient trace for a steel-on-steel contact showing the coefficient of static friction (“A”) and the coefficient of dynamic friction (“B”) measured from each cycle More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003281
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... Coefficient The static friction force, F s , is that force which is just sufficient to resist the onset of relative motion between two bodies in contact under an applied normal force, N. The kinetic friction force, F k , is that force which must be overcome to allow the continuance of motion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005668
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... to initiate sliding, but the tangential force required to initiate sliding is usually greater than that necessary to maintain sliding. It is therefore common practice to distinguish between the coefficient of static friction, µ s , and the coefficient of dynamic friction, µ d . When quoting a friction...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006397
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... to move when the surface is raised to an angle (θ) where the tangential force from gravity ( W sin θ) equals the frictional force ( W cos θ × μ), such that: (Eq 2) μ s = tan θ where μ s is the static coefficient of friction ( Fig. 1 ). Typically, a greater force also is needed to set...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006371
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
.... The article concludes with specific recommendations for reducting of seal friction and wear. abrasion seals cavitation damage chemical attack clamping compression set static seals dynamic seals corrosion dieseling damage extrusion damage friction installation damage reciprocating seals...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003030
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... The friction force required to set a body in motion is typically greater than the force needed to sustain the motion. The respective coefficients of friction are the static coefficient of friction, μ s , and the kinetic (or dynamic) coefficient of friction, μ k . Typical values for kinetic coefficient...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006367
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... of PVDF/UHMWPE blends containing varying amounts of CB are relevant ( Ref 13 ). The data on these particular composites provide measurements of both electrical resistivity as well as friction. Figure 2 shows the effect of CB concentration on static friction, dynamic friction, and volume resistivity...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005153
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... binder force of 575 kN (65 tonf) In order for the blank edge to move toward the punch during the cup drawing process, the force of friction between the blank and the die must be overcome. The normal force created by the binder adds significantly to the force of static friction in accordance...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.a0005540
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
.... Correctly capturing the contact and calculating the friction force is not an easy task for static implicit codes. Capturing the onset of wrinkling and correctly predicting the actual formation of wrinkles are also difficult challenges for static implicit codes. One fundamental characteristic of the static...
Image
Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 2 Variations in maximum shear stress as a function of depth for three different friction coefficients; (a) μ ≈ 0, (b) 0 ≤ μ ≤ 0.11, and (c) μ ≥ 0.11. This figure is for static loading, but the range of shear stress versus depth is also at or very near the surface for tangential forces from More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006500
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... of metal inert gas (MIG) welding, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, and FSW were compared in aluminum alloy 6082 ( Ref 27 ). The static transverse tensile strengths of butt welds made using these techniques were similar ( Table 2 ), although the friction-stir-welded joints showed marginally higher static...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006100
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... if the surface becomes wet. Friction Applications The coefficient of friction (μ) and the wear resistance are the two key parameters in the selection of a friction material. The coefficient of friction may be expressed as a static or dynamic value. The static coefficient of friction is the friction value...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006403
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... as either static or dynamic friction, representing, respectively, either the resistance to initiate motion or the resistance to sustain relative motion of contacting bodies. For sliding friction, the average frictional power ( P F ) with a sliding velocity ( v ) is thus P F = F F × v (or = f × F...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006362
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... with a compressible gas. The article also describes the different types of aerostatic bearings, such as annular thrust bearings and orifice-compensated journal bearings. It presents a discussion on load capacity and stiffness, friction and power loss, and stability and damping of the aerostatic bearings. The article...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006410
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
...Abstract Abstract This article focuses on environmental and application factors in solid friction. It covers the tribology of contact between a soft and hard material, including mechanisms and testing. The article describes the tribology of contact between a metal and tool during metalworking...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006426
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
...Abstract Abstract Rolling-element bearings, also called rolling bearings and antifriction bearings, tend to have very low friction characteristics compared to plain bearings or simple sliding bearings. This article discusses the types of rolling-element bearings, namely, ball bearings...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006374
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... The COF is a key parameter when choosing a friction material. The COF may be expressed as a static or dynamic value. The static COF is based on the friction force between two surfaces at zero speed, while the dynamic COF is a measured value of the coefficient at speeds greater than zero. The COF...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006375
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... metals ( Ref 46 ). Figure 12 presents the average coefficients of static friction for the various alloys of Fig. 11 as a function of solute-to-iron atomic radius ratio. The maximum solute concentration extended to approximately 16 at.%. The good agreement between the coefficient of friction...