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Book Chapter

By S.L. Rohde
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001288
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... Abstract Sputtering is a nonthermal vaporization process in which the surface atoms are physically ejected from a surface by momentum transfer from an energetic bombarding species of atomic/molecular size. It uses a glow discharge or an ion beam to generate a flux of ions incident on the target...
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 11(a) Raw 11 B + and 30 Si 2+ secondary ion signals versus sputtering time for a boron-implanted silicon substrate. Obtained using oxygen beam bombardment in an ion microscope More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 24 Cylindrical magnetron sputtering. Source: Ref 17 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 23 Gas-discharge chamber for reactive sputtering and optical examination of interference layers on polished specimens. The results of the reactive sputtering process can be monitored through the viewing window. (a) Chamber mounted on a microscope stage. (b) Schematic of the various More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 1 Basic sputtering process More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 3 Schematic of the basic sputtering process More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 26 Physical vapor deposition process used to apply coating by sputtering More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 11 Auger electron spectroscopy depth profile using monoatomic argon sputtering through the nickel film. A nickel silicide is observed at the interface. More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 10 Sputtering crater from a Grimm-type glow discharge lamp More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 30 Surface sputtering of silicon. Sputter rates increase for angles of approximately 80 to 85°, because the collision cascade is proximal to the surface. More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 54 Nanoplasmonic devices fabricated by direct sputtering of a metal layer on a quartz substrate. Adapted and reprinted with permission from Ref 91. ©2019 IEEE More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 25 Schematic of sputtering setup with mask to generate a bevel. Adapted from Ref 69 More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 2 Physical effects of primary ion bombardment: implantation and sputtering More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 11 (a) Raw 11 B + and 30 Si 2+ secondary ion signals versus sputtering time for a boron-implanted silicon substrate. Acquired using oxygen beam bombardment in an ion microscope. (b) Boron profile after quantitative analysis of the sputtering rate and secondary ion intensity More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 3 Schematic diagram of the sputtered species ejected during primary ion bombardment of a compound i x j y . These sputtered species may be monatomic, molecular, and/or incorporate implanted primary ions. i = ○, j = ● More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 11(b) Boron profile (see Fig. 11(a) ) after quantitative analysis of the sputtering rate and secondary ion intensity. More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 22 Sputter coating schematic More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 6 Sputter-deposited chromium-niobium and chromium-tantalum alloys. (a) Corrosion rates of alloys compared to pure chromium, niobium, and tantalum. (b) Polarization curves of sputter-deposited chromium-niobium alloys and pure chromium and niobium. The number corresponds to the atomic More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 18 Sputter-depth profile results for passive film grown on Mg 65 Cu 25 Y 10 from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, assuming the metal peaks are from the metal beneath the surface oxide layer. Source: Ref 120 More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 4 Structure-zone model for sputter-deposited films ( Ref 33 ) More