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spiral bevel gears

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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 9 Simulated crack growth in spiral-bevel gears. The model provides color images. The largest values are at the ends of the crack. The smallest values (compressive) are in the concave area above the crack. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 9 Forged spiral bevel gears with near-net teeth More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003986
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... factors that impact the precision forging process. It provides information on the achievable tolerances and presents examples of precision forging. A discussion on forging of bevel gears/spiral bevel gears is also presented. axle shafts bevel gears precision flashless forging precision hot...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 48 Carburized 4817 steel spiral bevel gear. The gear broke from fatigue at acute-angle intersections of mounting holes and tooth-root fillets as a result of through hardening. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 42 Grinding of a spiral bevel gear. Dimensions in figure given in inches Gear details Type Spiral bevel (octoid) Number of teeth 51 Diametral pitch 4 Helix angle 30° Whole depth, mm (in.) 12.07 (0.475) Tolerance, tooth-to-tooth, mm (in.) 0.008 (0.0003 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 17 Spiral bevel gear tooth. Tooth-bending fatigue with origin at the apex of the drilled bolt hole, which terminated just below the root radius. 0.5× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 27 Spiral bevel gear teeth. Original pitting low on the active profile gives initiation to a fast and extensive progression of spalling over the top face and down the back profile. This is often called the cyclone effect. 0.25× More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 32 Spiral bevel gear and pinion set that sheared in the reverse direction. The pinion came to a sudden and complete stop at the instant of primary failure of the unit, allowing the gear to shear the contacting teeth and to continue rotating over the failed area. 0.4× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 35 Case crushing at midprofile of a spiral bevel gear tooth. Progression is from the subcase area into the core and outward to the surface. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 36 Spiral bevel gear teeth showing contact wear. Insert A shows a tooth area exhibiting no wear. Insert B shows abrasive wear clearly cutting away 3.2 mm ( 1 8 in.) of the surface without damage to underlying material. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 42 Spiral bevel gear tooth. Internal rupture is lifting the entire top of a tooth. More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 41 Waguri grinding method for nongenerated spiral bevel and hypoid gears More
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001815
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
..., the set is called a miter gear set. Any change in the number of teeth will change speed as well as direction. Fig. 6 Four types of bevel gears. See text for discussion. Fig. 7 Angles and terminology for straight bevel gears. Spiral Bevel Gears Spiral bevel gears ( Fig. 6b ) have...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006820
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... Abstract This article first reviews variations within the most common types of gears, namely spur, helical, worm, and straight and spiral bevel. It then provides information on gear tooth contact and gear metallurgy. This is followed by sections describing the important points of gear...
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 1 One of the 64 cm (25 in.) automatic quenching machines manufactured by The Gleason Works in Rochester, NY, in the early 1930s. The operator is removing a large spiral bevel gear from the lower die sembly after the quenching operation has been completed. Courtesy of The Gleason Works More
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002145
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... Fig. 10 Angles and terminology for straight bevel gears Spiral Bevel Gears Spiral bevel gears ( Fig. 9b ) have teeth that are curved and oblique. The inclination of the teeth results in gradual engagement and continuous line contact or overlapping action; that is, more than one tooth...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005869
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... Report ARL-TR-1109, 1996 8. Handschuh R.F. and Bibel G.D. , “Comparison of Experimental and Analytical Tooth Bending Stress of Aerospace Spiral Bevel Gears,” NASA /TM-1999-208903, Army Research Laboratory Technical Report ARL-TR-1891, 1999 9. Handschuh R.F. and Bill...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005809
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... of unbalanced thermal and transformation stresses induced by the quenching operation itself. High precision components such as industrial bearing races and automotive spiral bevel gears can often distort unpredictably during unconstrained or free oil quenching as a result of these factors. Press quenching...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002375
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... gear (b), and a low-angle helical gear (c). Lines on tooth faces of typical teeth are lines of contact. Helical, Spiral Bevel, and Hypoid Gears Gear tooth contact on helical, spiral bevel, and hypoid gears is similar to that developed on a stepped spur gear ( Fig. 2 ). Each section...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 9 Lines of contact on a stepped spur gear. The heavy line on a tooth face of each gear section represents the instantaneous line of contact for that section. This offset-contact pattern is typical for helical, spiral bevel, and hypoid gears. More