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Book Chapter

By B.P. Bewlay, D.U. Furrer
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005123
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... Abstract Metal spinning is a term used to describe the forming of metal into seamless, axisymmetric shapes by a combination of rotational motion and force. This article describes two forming techniques, such as manual spinning and power spinning, for forming seamless metal components...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1986
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0001750
EISBN: 978-1-62708-178-8
... Abstract Electron spin resonance (ESR), or electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), is an analytical technique that can extract a great deal of information from any material containing unpaired electrons. This article explains how ESR works and where it applies in materials characterization...
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 4 The processes of (a) spinning and (b) shear spinning More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2 Spinning methods of flame hardening. In methods shown at left and at center, the part rotates. In method at right, the flame head rotates. Quench not shown More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3 Combination progressive-spinning flame hardening More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 34 Treating the aluminum melt with flushing gas in the spinning nozzle inert flotation (SNIF) process. Source: Ref 36 More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 9 Spinning head, used to produce fiberglass. Courtesy of MG Industries/Steigerwald More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 1 Various components produced by metal spinning. Courtesy of Leifeld USA Metal Spinning, Inc. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 2 Schematic diagram of the manual metal-spinning process, showing the deformation of a metal disk over a mandrel to form a cone More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 3 Typical components that can be produced by manual metal spinning. Conical, cylindrical, and dome shapes are shown. Some product examples include bells, tank ends, funnels, caps, aluminum kitchen utensils, and light reflectors. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 4 Photograph of conical components that were produced by metal spinning. Courtesy of Leifeld USA Metal Spinning, Inc. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 5 Typical arrangements for manual spinning using a lathe. (a) Simple arrangement with a friction-type spinning tool. (b) More complex setup using levers and a spinning roller More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 6 Typical arrangement for power spinning a cone in a single operation. The mandrel diameter is 188 mm (7.5 in.), t 1 is the thickness of the preform, and t 2 is the wall thickness of the final conical component. The included angle of the cone is ╬▒. For the case of power spinning More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 7 Typical arrangement for power spinning a cone in two stages. The two-step approach is used for small included cone angles (35┬░ in this figure). Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 8 Schematic diagrams of a vertical arrangement employed for power spinning of large-diameter cones. The diagram shows the preform, clamping cylinder, and the positioning cylinders that are used to control the axial, radial, and angular positions of the roller and for the forming scheme More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 11 Automated metal-spinning machine for forming cone-shaped components. The lathe, roller, mandrel, and controls work station can be seen. Courtesy of Leifeld USA Metal Spinning, Inc. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 12 Typical mandrel used for power spinning of cones. Generally, there are small bosses on the nose and tail for clamping in the tailstock and headstock, respectively. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 13 Diagrams of typical forming rollers used for spinning of cones and hemispheres. (a) Full-radius roller. (b) Roller profiled for forming corners. (c) Roller used for reducing the wall thickness. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 16 Maximum spinning reduction per pass as a function of tensile fracture strain for materials of a range of tensile strengths. For materials with tensile ductilities of greater than 50%, there is no further increase in the spinnability. Source: Ref 1 , 4 More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 19 Spinning and trimming that eliminated necessity for oversize bar stock and material waste by machining. Dimensions given in inches More