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spent pickle liquor disposal

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001229
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... involved in the batch, continuous, and electrolytic pickling of carbon steel components. The article describes the effects of process variables on scale removal in sulfuric and hydrochloric acid. It concludes with a description of pickling defects, spent pickle liquor disposal, and safety practices...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001314
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... and the need to treat the rinse water. However, the removed scale and spent media may be considered a solid waste for disposal purposes. An alternative method is to soak the oxidized material in hydrochloric acid pickle (Formula 11, Table 1 ), followed by flash pickling if brightening is required...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004190
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... in a steam heated aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium sulfide (NaS 2 ), also known as white liquor. The spent pulping liquor, called black liquor, is concentrated by evaporation and burned to generate high-pressure steam for the mill processes. The inorganic portion of the black...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003213
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... describes common cleaning processes, including alkaline, electrolytic, solvent, emulsion, molten salt bath, ultrasonic and acid cleaning as well as pickling and abrasive blasting. It also explains how to select the appropriate process for a given soil type and surface composition. abrasive blast...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001227
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... and acetic acids at high concentrations. Most of the organic acids are nonvolatile; therefore, harmful vapors are not released during the cleaning operation. Spent organic acid cleaning solutions can be disposed of with relative ease. A variety of methods, such as biodegradation, chemical treatment...