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solvent waste

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001223
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... limitations and applications, and safety and health hazards of cold cleaning and vapor degreasing. It also includes information on control of contamination, conservation and recovery of solvent, and disposal of solvent wastes. Selected References Selected References • Clean Air Act Amendments...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001224
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... equipment emulsion cleaners emulsion cleaning immersion cleaning organic solvent process selection criteria secondary cleaning solvent waste solvent waste disposal spray cleaning ...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001321
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... in 40 CFR 261.3) Exhibits a hazardous characteristic (flammability, corrosivity, reactivity, or toxicity) Is a mixture of solid waste with hazardous waste. The resultant mixture is hazardous with some exceptions. Limiting the VOC solvent content of paint Limiting the vapor pressure...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003691
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... into drains or waterways. Spills, cleanup, and reporting The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or superfund addresses the current release of hazardous substances (e.g., solvents, lead, etc.) and addresses the cleanup of EPA-identified waste sites. CERCLA...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001324
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... are included as pollutants on the NESHAP list. Because of these regulations, TCE and PCE have become costly to use for vapor degreasing applications. The higher costs are due to the limits on emissions and the controls required to capture these emissions, plus the restrictions on the disposal of waste...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004125
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... characteristics, these coating systems have been identified as a major contributor to the generation of hazardous materials and hazardous waste for the Navy ( Ref 3 ). Volatile organic compounds, such as carrier solvents plasticizers, and heavy metal compounds, such as corrosion inhibitors and colorants...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1986
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0001776
EISBN: 978-1-62708-178-8
... in the analysis of petroleum oil, coal gasification and liquefaction products, drugs, metabolites, food products, perfumes and other cosmetics, plasticizers, pesticides, pollutants in air, waste water and solid waste, products and by-products of manufacturing processes, and solvents used in manufacturing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005777
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... as well as tighter process controls for optimum cleaning. Spent solvents are classified as a hazardous waste. Handling and disposal of these solvents are more involved and expensive than other cleaning alternatives. There are a few emerging technologies for precision cleaning that are technologically...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001227
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... power plant construction must be dissolved and flushed out of the unit. Because these oxidation products often contain radioactive materials, solvent and rinse waters require care in disposal. The following considerations are important for proper disposal of waste material: solvent volumes should...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001053
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... additional steps, including secondary nickel refining, degreasing, and separation of metallurgical wastes. iron scrap scrap demand scrap processor scrap recycling industry stainless steel scrap superalloy scrap metal recycling RECYCLING can be simply defined as the use of a material over...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006061
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) before relying solely on respiratory protection Negative pressure inside the work area enclosure or containment so that surface preparation waste and paint debris cannot escape the enclosure Air for the dilution of flashing solvents...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0006636
EISBN: 978-1-62708-213-6
... efficiency, solvent consumption, detection mode(s), detection sensitivity, flexibility, ease of use, and cost. Understanding instrument capabilities is important when developing and troubleshooting analytical methods. Figure 2 shows the flow path from solvent reservoirs to waste. A single solvent reservoir...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004143
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... and the expense of waste disposal. Chemical cleaning solvents must be evaluated in a corrosion test program before acceptance for use. For decades, common practice among industrial cleaning contractors and their customers has been to use volume percent (vol%) for surfactants and corrosion inhibitors. Other...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004188
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... process equipment materials to manufacture chemical products using organic or mixed solvents than when the process environments are only aqueous. Chemical companies handle this uncertainty by overdesigning the equipment (wasting money and energy), rather than by accepting increased risks of corrosion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002438
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... the protection of wildlife habitats, open spaces, and wilderness. Reduction and disposal of waste: Companies will minimize waste and recycle wherever possible. Wise use of energy: Companies will use environmentally safe energy sources and invest in energy conservation. Risk reduction: Companies...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004137
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
...-Desulfurization Systems , Chem. Eng. , 19 Sept 1983 , p 81 – 86 4. Agarwal D.C. and Hodge F.G. , “Material Selection Processes and Case Histories Associated with the Hazardous Industrial and Municipal Waste Treatment Industries,” Cabot Corporation 5. Kirchner R.W...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006025
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
.... Environmental restrictions on coating application methods typically are a result of volatile solvent(s) in coating formulations that are emitted during application. This is particularly prevalent when the coating being applied has a strong odor and/or flammable solvents that have the potential to create...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001274
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... Acid versus Those Coated with Phosphate Phosphoric acid metal cleaners usually consist of phosphoric acid and a water-soluble solvent, with or without a wetting agent. In the preparation of metal with such solutions, the purpose is to complete the following steps in a single operation: remove oil...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001326
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... and incinerated in permitted hazardous waste incinerators. Volatile organic compound content is determined using the test method described in ASTM D 3960. Wipe solvent cleaners with flash points higher than 37.8 °C (100 °F) are classified by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA...
Book Chapter

Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005354
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... in solvent evaporation, which lowers bench life and may result in friable core surfaces. A usable sand-temperature working range is (10 to 38 °C) (50 to 100 °F). High moisture levels in the sand also result in decreased bench life and ultimate strengths. In addition to reacting with the isocyanate, moisture...