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soldering fluxes

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004173
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... on electronic and electrical components are illustrated by actual field-failure examples. Corrosion and related phenomena cause a variety of failures in electronic and electrical passive components. Although the most pervasive factor in corrosion-related failures is solder-flux residue, environmental...
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Published: 01 January 2024
also consider the possibility of a leak causing incidental corrosion if the media in the hose were corrosive. Failure was ultimately the result of dripped solder flux from an overhanging joint. The scale is in 1/16 in. More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005856
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... important, because the brazing or soldering flux needs time to remove the surface oxides that are present on the parts. The flux also will keep surface oxides from forming within the joint area as heat is applied up to the joining temperature. When the surfaces of the joint interface have been cleaned...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003211
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... common impurity elements in tin-lead solders. It describes the various processes involved in the successful soldering of joints, including shaping the parts to fit closely together; cleaning and preparing the surfaces to be joined; applying a flux; assembling the parts; and applying the heat and solder...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001346
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Soldering is defined as a joining process by which two substrates are bonded together using a filler metal with a liquidus temperature. This article provides an overview of fundamentals of soldering and presents guidelines for flux selection. Types of fluxes, including rosin-base...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001344
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract This article presents an introduction to brazing, including information on its mechanics, advantages, and limitations. It reviews soldering with emphasis on chronology, solder metals, and flux technology. The article also provides useful information on mass, wave, and drag soldering...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001459
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
..., including types of solder alloy in terms of selection process; selection of substrate base material; flux selection based on adequate wettability by the solder; solder joint assembly; combined substrate, solder, and flux properties; and manufacturing procedures. Each of these parameters is explored using...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001460
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... discusses the categories that are most important to successful electronic soldering, namely, solders and fluxes selection, nature of base materials and finishes, solder joint design, and solderability testing. capacitors electronic applications packaged integrated circuits resistors solder joint...
Book Chapter

By Paul T. Vianco
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001401
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... on process parameters, which can be divided into three groups: the fluxing operation, solder wave properties, and process schedule. It provides information on various solder defects. printed circuit boards solder defects surface-mount technology through-hole technology wave soldering WAVE...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001492
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... to prevent crevices that may generate crevice corrosion, especially when the environment has chloride ions in solution. The flux should be easily removed to avoid residues that can accelerate the corrosion rate in the joint. Electronic Packaging Filler metal compositions and forms for soldering have...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001395
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... °F/s). The rate of heating should be based on the application, and the component complement should be considered. Throughout the preheat stage, activators commence “scrubbing” and some solvents begin to evaporate. In certain solder paste formulations, some of the flux activators may begin oxide...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001479
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
..., conduction, and radiation. Sufficient energy must be applied to melt the solder and to raise the temperature of the substrate to a level at which a solder-substrate reaction can occur. A clean, oxide-free surface is necessary for this reaction to occur. The use of a flux usually aids this reaction...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001394
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... is accomplished in air, and this flux often must be removed in order to prevent part corrosion Highly reactive materials, such as titanium and many refractory metals, cannot be soldered, because no suitable fluxes are available Soldered joints do not normally exceed the strength of the parts being soldered...
Book Chapter

By Roy E. Beal
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001396
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
..., which can range in size from very small to large, are used in a wide range of industries. The process of dip soldering is simple to carry out. The joint areas are cleaned and then coated with an appropriate flux. The parts are then lowered into the molten filler metal and joining takes place...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001450
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... are essential in both brazing and soldering processes. Chemically active substances, called fluxes, are commonly used to provide such cleaning and shielding. The use of nonmetallic agents in fluxes is generally undesirable, because of the increased propensity for their entrapment and the resultant formation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004129
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... that maintenance operations may entail. The corrosivity of solder flux residues and etching solutions, and the cleanliness testing of printed circuit boards (PCBs) prior to conformal coating, became issues in the manufacturing process to lessen corrosion problems. Potting, hermetic sealing, conformal coating...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003831
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... In the case of soldered/brazed/welded joints, variables such as the materials being joined, the filler metal and fluxes used, and the geometry, orientation, and environment all play important roles in the corrosion behavior of the joint. Inasmuch as corrosion can cause degradation, structural or functional...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006302
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
... and chemical reactions). For both soldering and brazing, the fillers tend to be alloys with eutectic or near-eutectic compositions from alloy systems having eutectics. Fluxes in brazing and soldering also are used to remove oxides from the base metal surface, to protect the clean surface from reoxidation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006079
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract Metals and alloy powders are used in welding, hardfacing, brazing, and soldering applications, which include hardface coatings, the manufacturing of welding stick electrodes and flux-cored wires, and additives in brazing pastes or creams. This article reviews these applications...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003210
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... such as diffusion and exothermic brazing. The article explains joint design, filler materials, fuel gases, equipment, and fluxes in the brazing methods. The article also describes the brazing of steels, stainless steels, cast irons, heat-resistant alloys, aluminum alloys, copper and copper alloys, and titanium...