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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 28 Maximum force required for blanking a 25.4 mm (1 in.) diameter slug from 3.2 mm ( 1 8 in.) thick flat naval brass stock (hardness, 62 HRB) More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 29 Maximum force required for blanking a 25.4 mm (1 in.) diameter slug from 3.2 mm ( 1 8 in.) thick flat stainless steel stock (hardness, 85 HRB) More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 30 Maximum force required for blanking a 25.4 mm (1 in.) diameter slug from 3.2 mm ( 1 8 in.) thick flat aluminum stock (hardness, 73 HRB) More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 35 Back extrusion of the cup shape shown in Fig. 34 . (a) The preform slug was 16 mm (0.625 in.) in diameter, the die was 19 mm (0.75 in.) in diameter. (b) Strains at the cup rim where fracture occurred consist of circumferential tension to a value of 0.18 and very little compressive strain More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 38 Modified preform slug for the back extrusion of the cup shape shown in Fig. 34 . The slug diameter is 18.8 mm (0.74 in.) and has a 5┬░ taper on the top surface. More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 7 Methods of flux loading studs. (a) Pressed in slug. (b) Staked on washer. (c) Coating More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 3 Guidance chart to determine infiltrating slug weight required to achieve the desired infiltrated density. Solid lines, IP-174 and IP-190; dashed lines, IP-195-LD/HD and IP-204. To find the appropriate slug-to-matrix ratio (S/M), draw a line across the figure at the desired infiltrated More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 13 Slug pickup More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 10 Flatpack proximity sensor used for slug ejection. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 7 Methods of flux loading studs. (a) Pressed in slug. (b) Staked on washer. (c) Coating More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006526
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... for tooling, dies, punches, and other equipment. It covers typical tool materials and their working properties, and provides best practices for sizing aluminum slugs and preparing them for use. The article also discusses the wide range of achievable shapes from shallow cup-like extrusions to deep cups...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004005
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
...Abstract Abstract Cold extrusion is a push-through compressive forming process with the starting material (billet/slug) at room temperature. This article provides information on the different types of steels that can be cold extruded. Mechanical presses and hydraulic presses...
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 10 Traveling wire EDM job. The inside piece is the part to be kept (a punch, for example). If the outside is to be kept, as in a die, the start hole is in the slug. The glue strap keeps the slug from falling and maintains electrical continuity to the finish. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
at instant blank is held by forming tools or positive blankholder. (b) Rear cutoff, for separating blanks by removal of slugs of straight or shaped configurations. Small back-plate is furnished for cutoff-die mounting, allowing slug-removal-type parting when left-hand forming slide is used. (c) Split slide More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 1 Effect of punch-to-die clearance per side (as a percentage of stock thickness, t ) on characteristics of edges of holes and slugs (or blanks) produced by piercing or blanking low-carbon steel sheet or strip at a maximum hardness of 75 HRB. Table 1 lists clearances for producing the five More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 2 Effect of punch-to-die clearance per side (as a percentage of stock thickness, t ) on characteristics of edges of holes and slugs (or blanks) produced by piercing or blanking low-carbon steel sheet or strip at a maximum hardness of 75 HRB. Table 1 lists clearances for producing the five More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 17 Four types of batch inhibitor treating techniques. (a) Standard batch. (b) Annular slug. (c) Extended batch. (d) Tubing displacement More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 3 Effect of carbon content, annealing treatment, and extrusion ratio on maximum ram pressure in the forward extrusion of the carbon steel part from the preformed slug More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 13 Typical flaws in seamless tubing. (a) Blister. (b) Gouge. (c) Lamination. (d) Lap (arrow). (e) Pit. (f) Plug scores. (g) Rolled-in slugs. (h) Scab. (j) Seam (arrow) More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 39 Comparison of measured strains at the cup rim during back extrusion of the modified preform slug shown in Fig. 38 . The strains do not exceed the material fracture strain line for low or high strain rate forming. More