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sliding wear

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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 3 Examples of mild and severe wear morphology. (a) A lubricated sliding wear scar on steel in the mild wear regime. (b) The appearance of the same type of scar in the severe wear regime More
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 10 Sliding wear behavior of Al-SiC MMCs. (a) Effect of SiC content on wear of composite and steel counterface. (b) Effect of temperature of wear rate. (c) Effect of applied load on wear rate. (d) A wear map for Al-SiC composite. After Ref 56 , 58 More
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 11 Sliding wear of Al-graphite MMCs. (a) Wear rate versus graphite content (number in parenthesis in legend correspond to load, sliding speed, and sliding distance). (b) Measured coefficient of friction versus graphite content. (c) Comparison of wear behavior for unreinforced Al, Al + SiC More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 12 Examples of mild and severe wear morphology. (a) Lubricated sliding wear scar on steel in the mild wear regime. (b) Appearance of the same type of scar in the severe wear regime More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 18 Sliding wear traces on carburized steel samples. Falex test, transmission electron micrograph More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 10 Sliding wear behavior of laser-hardened cast irons as a function of case depth. (a) Gray iron. (b) Ductile iron. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 14 Sliding wear behavior of Ti-TiB composite compared to the unreinforced alloy. After Ref 67 More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 6 Dry sliding wear maps. (a) Steels. Source: Ref 5 , 17 . (b) 7071 aluminum alloy sliding against AISI 32100 steel. Source: Ref 18 . (c) Low-metallic-friction material sliding against pearlitic cast iron. Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 9 Schematic of the influence of lubrication regime on rolling-sliding wear. Adapted from Ref 5 More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 11 Factors influencing the sliding wear of alloys. Reprinted with permission from American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). Source: Ref 23 More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 13 Self-mated pin-on-disc sliding wear volume loss of cobalt-base alloys versus carbon content. Test procedure similar to ASTM G133-02, procedure A (25 N, or 5.6 lbf; 5 Hz frequency; 10 mm, or 0.4 in., reciprocating stroke length; 100 m, or 330 ft, sliding distance), except that the pin More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 14 Ball-on-flat sliding wear volume loss of cobalt-base alloys versus carbon content. Test procedure similar to ASTM G133-02, procedure A (25 N, or 5.6 lbf; 1 Hz frequency; 10 mm, or 0.4 in., reciprocating stroke length; 500 m, or 1640 ft, sliding distance) conducted with sintered WC-6wt More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 15 Ball-on-flat sliding wear volume loss of cobalt-base alloys versus relative sum of carbon and tungsten or molybdenum content, R cw or R cm . Test procedure similar to ASTM G133-02, procedure A (25 N, or 5.6 lbf; 1 Hz frequency; 10 mm, or 0.4 in., reciprocating stroke length; 500 m More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 6 Schematic of the failure mechanism for the sliding wear of short fiber–reinforced polymers. Adapted from Ref 21