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sintering atmosphere

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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 1 Effect of sintering atmosphere on the phase structures produced in low- and medium-chromium ferritic stainless steels during sintering. (a) Hydrogen sintering produces ferritic structure for both alloys. (b) Dissociated ammonia sintering leads to extensive martensite formation in low More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 16 Impact of boron nitride (BN) additions and sintering atmosphere on the final sintered density of 420 stainless steel powder. Source: Ref 167 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006135
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract Sintering atmosphere protects metal parts from the effects of contact with air and provides sufficient conduction and convection for uniform heat transfer to ensure even heating or cooling within various furnace sections, such as preparation, sintering, initial cooling, and final...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006137
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract This article discusses the requirements for safe design, installation, operation, inspection, testing, and maintenance of sintering atmosphere generators and atmosphere supply systems for both personal and environment safety. The four intrinsic dangers associated with producing...
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 13 Effect of nitrogen-base sintering atmospheres on reduction of oxygen. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 9 Typical time-temperature profile for sintering with a nitrogen atmosphere More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 12 Sintering schedule for binder jetting of copper in a reducing atmosphere (hydrogen). A heating and cooling rate of 5 °C/min (9 °F/min) is used. A 30 min hold at 450 °C (840 °F) is followed by sintering at 1075 °C (1965 °F) for 3 h. Source: Ref 42 - 47 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001044
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
...; type of compacting press; design of compacting tools and dies; type of sintering furnace; composition of the sintering atmosphere; choice of production cycle, including sintering time and temperature; and secondary operations and heat treatment. When the application of a powder metallurgy part requires...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006119
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... relating to welding of PM stainless steels, specifically, the effects of density, residual porosity, and sintered chemistry on weldability. Further, the article investigates the influence the sintering atmosphere has on machinability, as well as differences created by the presence of residual porosity...
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 9 (a) Scanning electron microscopy image of as-sintered surface of a 316L part showing spherical oxides formed during cooling from the sintering temperature. These are oxides of silicon, and their formation is promoted by a high dewpoint of the sintering atmosphere and slow rate More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006118
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract This article describes the sintering behavior of austenitic, ferritic, and martensitic stainless steels. It presents different sintering schedules that are selected by Metal Powder Industries Federation (MPIF). The article provides information on the equipment and atmospheres used...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006111
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract This article provides information on the most frequently used atmospheres in commercial sintering of powder metallurgy iron and steel materials. These include endothermic, exothermic, dissociated ammonia, pure hydrogen, and nitrogen-base atmospheres. The article discusses sintering...
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 1 Impact strength of three ferritic stainless steels as a function of sintering temperature and sintered density. Sintering atmosphere was hydrogen, and sintering time was 30 min. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 14 Nitrogen content of compacts sintered in nitrogen-base atmospheres. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 9 Dimensional change data for a number of PM stainless steels as functions of sintering temperature, green density, and sintering atmosphere. Sintering time, 45 min. Lubricant, 1.0% Acrawax C. (a) 303L dissociated ammonia sinter. (b) 303L H 2 sinter. (c) 304L dissociated ammonia sinter More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 1 Thermal conductivity of sintered 316L as a function of sintered density for hydrogen (left) and 30%H 2 -70%N 2 sintering atmosphere (right). Broken line represents pore-free 316L. More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 9 Densities of sintered Fe 3 O 4 vs. the oxygen partial pressure in the sintering atmosphere More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 3 Corrosion weight loss for 316 stainless steel as a function of sintering atmosphere for three sintering temperatures. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 3 Corrosion weight loss for 316L in 10% HNO 3 shown as a function of the sintering atmosphere for three sintering temperatures. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 16 Scanning electron microscopy image of the surface of an as-sintered 304L part showing chromium nitride precipitates along the grain boundaries and in the grains. Sintering atmosphere was dissociated ammonia. More