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Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003112
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract Iron powders are the most widely used powder metallurgy (P/M) material for structural parts. This article reviews low to medium density iron and low-alloy steel parts produced by the pressing and sintering technology. It explains different powder production methods, including Hoeganaes...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 17
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v17.a0006445
EISBN: 978-1-62708-190-0
... Abstract The potential for introducing defects during processing becomes greater as the relative density of pressed and sintered powder metallurgy (PM) parts increases and more multilevel parts with complex geometric shapes are produced. This article discusses the potential defects in pressed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006135
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract Sintering atmosphere protects metal parts from the effects of contact with air and provides sufficient conduction and convection for uniform heat transfer to ensure even heating or cooling within various furnace sections, such as preparation, sintering, initial cooling, and final...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006069
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract This article discusses two major sintering methods: pressureless and pressure-assisted sintering. Pressureless sintering techniques include vacuum and partial-pressure, hydrogen, and microwave sintering. Pressure-assisted consolidation techniques include overpressure sintering...
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 10 Microstructure of sintered Fe-2Ni-0.5C alloy. Sintered for 30 min at 1120 °C (2050 °F). Arrows marked Ni outline nickel-rich particle. Arrow M, martensite or bainite at nickel-rich boundary. Arrows marked L, diffusion layer between nickel and pearlite. This is not unalloyed ferrite More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 6 Plot of sintered strength vs. the particle size of zirconia sintered for 4 h at 2200 °C (3990 °F). The more active sintering of the smaller particles leads to improved strength. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 45 Effect of sintered density on corrosion resistance of sintered 316 type alloys. Source: Ref 1 , 32 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 6 Fatigue curves for vacuum-sintered 304L and 316L as a function of sintered density. Sintered densities of 304L and 316L were 6.51 and 6.54 g/cm 3 , respectively. Sintered densities of 304L9 were 6.90 and 6.89 g/cm 3 , respectively. Sintering temperature was 1288 °C (2350 °F). Source More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 1 Thermal conductivity of sintered 316L as a function of sintered density for hydrogen (left) and 30%H 2 -70%N 2 sintering atmosphere (right). Broken line represents pore-free 316L. More