1-20 of 457 Search Results for

shrinkage damage

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005277
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... Abstract This article provides a discussion on ten rules for the effective production of reliable castings. These rules include good-quality melt, liquid front damage, liquid front stop, bubble damage, core blows, shrinkage damage, convection damage, segregation, residual stress, and location...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006053
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... that are sintered to full density, such that no subsequent shaping is required, while maintaining required dimensional tolerances and shape. To keep postsinter shaping to a minimum requires an understanding of green density, shrinkage, and distortion. The green shaping process must take into account powder flow...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006760
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... or Cavity Shrinkage porosities or cavities are voids caused by the shrinkage of molten metal when cooling. They are indicative of a design or manufacturing problem. The porosities or cavities often have a lobed appearance with sharp corners, which can act as stress raisers and lead to fatigue damage...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 12
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1987
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v12.a0000620
EISBN: 978-1-62708-181-8
... to identify details of the mechanisms of fracture. However, this view does show many cavities, some of them resembling dark slits, indicating quite generally distributed shrinkage porosity. Smeared region at upper left indicates mechanical damage—probably in handling of the carrier tray after occurred. See...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003843
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... by the use of intentionally entrained air ( Ref 6 ). The tiny entrained air voids act as empty chambers in the paste for the migrating water to enter, thus relieving the pressure in the capillaries and pores and preventing damage to the concrete. Concrete with a low permeability (that is, a low water-cement...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005295
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... in the mold in the range of 125 to 255 cm/min (50 to 100 in./min). The steel stream from the ladle to the mold will oxidize during pouring, and considerable turbulence is generated in the mold. This method is damaging to the ingot mold, and mold iron consumption rates can be quite high. This method also...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003532
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... details at the edge, or, worse yet, drip onto the objective (in an inverted microscope), causing loss of image clarity or even damage. Figure 13 shows a large shrinkage gap between a phenolic mount and a piece of 6061-T6 aluminum etched with dilute aqueous hydrofluoric acid. Nomarski differential...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003161
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... be partly, completely, or more than compensated for by expansion due to aging. For example, bismuth alloys containing 33 to 66% Pb exhibit net expansion after solidification and during subsequent aging. Some fusible alloys show no contraction (shrinkage) and expand rapidly while still warm; others show...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0009014
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... in the bottom portion of the mold, coarser detail in the upper portions of the mold, more taper leading to thin sections, and so forth. Solidification Shrinkage Shrinkage occurs in three distinct stages: liquid shrinkage, liquid-to-solid shrinkage, and solid shrinkage. Liquid shrinkage...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003421
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... Abstract Ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) have ability to withstand high temperatures and have superior damage tolerance over monolithic ceramics. This article describes important processing techniques for CMCs: cold pressing, sintering, hot pressing, reaction-bonding, directed oxidation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003373
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
.... The matrix shrinkage of liquid precursors can have a profound effect on the composite properties as well. Carbon and noncarbon loss during carbonization is often a source of damage in the structure, especially during the early stages when there are no passages for the material to escape. When the evolved...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006303
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
... head of metal before the stopper is raised, allowing the metal to enter the sprue. Without the stopper, the basin and sprue fill poorly and much air is entrained, which damages the casting. The offset basin and stopper are perfectly accepted by aerospace founders but remain unpopular and problematic...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005221
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... is that the melt in the mold cavity contains a major population of large bifilms created by the poorly designed filling system, so that porosity resembling shrinkage porosity is rife. Only by increasing the feeder size (i.e., getting rid of a high proportion of the damaged metal) is the problem apparently...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006765
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... carefully, and obscure the microstructural details at the edge, or, worse yet, drip onto the objective (in an inverted microscope), causing loss of image clarity or even damage. Figure 5 shows a large shrinkage gap between a phenolic mount and a piece of 6061-T6 aluminum etched with dilute aqueous...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003508
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... and loading. Example 4: Damaged Austenitic Cast Iron Impellers in a Rotary Pump Caused by Cracks Initiated at Zones of Localized Shrinkage Porosity <xref rid="a0003508-ref11" ref-type="bibr">(Ref 11)</xref> Two damaged impellers manufactured from austenitic cast iron came from a rotary pump used...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1986
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0001754
EISBN: 978-1-62708-178-8
... and deformation, a lubricant or coolant is typically used. Wet cutting yields a flat relatively smooth surface. However, because of the abrasion associated with cutting, the structure of the metal or alloy is damaged to a depth of approximately 1 mm (0.04 in.). The exact depth of damage depends on the type...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005343
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... of the fracture origin, the direction of crack propagation, and identification of the final fracture region Presence of nonmetallic inclusions, shrinkage, or gas porosity or any other anomalies at or near the fracture origin Damage and wear to the surface of the part, both near to and away from the failure...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0009081
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... Abstract This article describes methods for analyzing impact-damaged composites in the aircraft industry. These include C-scan and x-radiography methods and optical microscopy. The article reviews brittle-matrix composite and tough-matrix composite failures. It explains the different types...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002490
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... not be confused with other mechanical moduli such as the modulus of elasticity.) A higher slope indicates a narrower distribution of failure stresses, that is, a narrower distribution of flaws or a more fracture-tough (damage-tolerant) material. A mean stress for failure can also be determined from the plot...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005308
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... of pattern plates has replaced much of the traditional patternmaking using master patterns. Fig. 3 Steps in producing a match plate pattern from a master pattern. (a) Wood master pattern is constructed with appropriate shrinkage factors included. A reverse from the master pattern. (b) Reverse mold...