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shielding gases

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005597
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract The shielding gas used in an arc welding process has a significant influence on the overall performance of the welding system. These gases are argon, helium, oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. This article discusses the shielding gas selection criteria for plasma arc...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005642
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract This article contains a table that lists the properties of various fuel gases, namely, acetylene, hydrogen, methane, methyl acetylene propadiene, propane, propylene, and natural gas. It discusses shielding gases, their mixtures and uses in gas metal arc welding, flux cored arc welding...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001340
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... gas will aid in the selection of the right shielding gas or gases for a welding application. Use of the best gas blend will improve the quality and may reduce the overall cost of the welding operation as well. Basic Properties of a Shielding Gas The “controlled electrical discharge” known...
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 8 Plot of arc voltage versus arc current for selected inert shielding gases. Welding parameters: anode, titanium; cathode, tungsten; polarity, direct current electrode negative; arc length, 12.7 mm (0.050 in.) More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 8 Plot of arc voltage versus arc current for selected inert shielding gases. Welding parameters: anode, titanium; cathode, tungsten; polarity, DCEN; arc length, 12.7 mm (0.050 in.) More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 26 Plot of penetration versus welding speed as a function of shielding gases and working distances for nonvacuum EBW of 4340 medium-carbon ultrahigh-strength steel. Beam power was 6.4 kW. More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 7 Comparison of laser weld penetration achieved with different shielding gases. Source: Ref 9 More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003206
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... information on process capabilities, principles of operation, power sources, electrodes, shielding gases, flux, process variables, and advantages and disadvantages of these arc welding methods. It presents information about the arc welding procedures of hardenable carbon and alloy steels, cast irons...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005582
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
..., current and operating modes, advantages, disadvantages, and applications of PAW. It discusses the personnel and equipment requirements, as well as the joints used in the process. The power source, plasma control console, water cooler, welding torch, and gas supply system for the plasma and shielding gases...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001357
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... of the PAW process, as well as the advantages and disadvantages. It describes the components of a basic PAW system, namely the power source, plasma control console, water cooler, welding torch, and gas supply system for the plasma and shielding gases. The article provides information on the applications...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005590
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
..., and applications of the process. It describes the equipment used for GTAW, namely, power supplies, torch construction and electrodes, shielding gases, and filler metals as well as the GTAW welding procedures. The article concludes with a review of the safety precautions to avoid possible hazards during the GTAW...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001439
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Most magnesium alloys can be joined by gas-tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas-metal arc welding (GMAW). This article describes relative weldability ratings and provides information on joint design and surface preparation and the use of filler metals and shielding gases suitable to arc...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001440
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... the role of filler metals and shielding gases in welding titanium and titanium alloys. It describes the equipment used for gas-tungsten arc welding and concludes with information on repair welds. alpha titanium alloys aluminum austenitic stainless steel electron-beam welding friction welding...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001441
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
...), plasma arc welding (PAW), electron-beam welding (EBW), laser-beam welding (LBW), friction welding (FRW), resistance welding (RW), resistance spot welding (RSW), and resistance seam welding (RSEW). The article reviews the selection of shielding gases and filler metals for welding zirconium alloys...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001433
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract This article discusses factors involved in selecting welding processes and consumables and establishing procedures and practices for the arc welding of low-alloy steels. It provides information on welding consumables in terms of filler metals and fluxes and shielding gases. The article...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001356
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
.... It schematically illustrates the key components of a GTAW manual torch. The article describes the process parameters, such as welding current, shielding gases, and filler metal. It discusses the GTAW process variations in terms of manual welding, mechanized welding, narrow groove welding, and automatic welding...
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 14 Comparison of CO 2 laser weld penetration achieved with different shielding gases. Source: Ref 38 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 3 Plot of fume formation rate versus current for mild steel solid wire using selected shielding gases. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 3 Plot of fume formation rate versus current for mild steel solid wire using selected shielding gases. Source: Ref 13 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001354
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
...-alloy steel, stainless steel, aluminum, copper, and nickel alloys can be welded in all positions by this process if appropriate shielding gases, electrodes, and welding parameters are chosen. Advantages The applications of the process are dictated by its advantages, the most important of which...