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shielding gas

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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 21 Effect of gas tungsten arc weld shielding gas composition on the corrosion resistance of two austenitic stainless steels. Welded strip samples were tested according to ASTM G 48; test temperature was 35 °C (95 °F). Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 13 Effect of shielding gas on depth of penetration during LBW of an austenite stainless steel. Laser power 15 kW. Travel speed, 25 mm/s (60 in./min). Source: Ref 38 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 9 Effect of electrode tip geometry and shielding gas composition on weld pool shape for spot-on-plate welds. Welding parameters: current, 150 A; duration, 2 s More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 1 Effect of shielding gas blends on weld profile using direct current electrode positive. (a) Argon versus argon-oxygen. (b) Carbon dioxide versus argon/carbon dioxide. (c) Helium versus argon-helium. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 10 Effect of shielding gas type on weld penetration and shape for steel More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 9 Effect of electrode tip geometry and shielding gas composition on weld pool shape for spot-on-plate welds. Welding parameters: current, 150 A; duration, 2 s More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Effect of shielding gas blends on weld profile using direct current electrode positive (DCEP). (a) Argon versus argon-oxygen. (b) Carbon dioxide versus argon/carbon dioxide. (c) Helium versus argon-helium. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 6 Effect of shielding gas on depth of penetration during LBW of an austenitic stainless steel. Laser power, 15 kW. Travel speed, 25 mm/s (60 in./min). Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 7 Sources of hydrogen in gas-metal arc welding. H G , hydrogen from shielding gas; H E , hydrogen from electrode; H B , hydrogen from base metal. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Setup for inert gas shielding for GTAW of titanium alloys outside a welding chamber. Gas shielding is from the torch and through parts in hold-down bars, backing bars, and from trailing and backup shields. More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001340
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract The shielding gas used in a welding process has a significant influence on the overall performance of the welding system. This article discusses the basic properties of a shielding gas in terms of ionization potential, thermal conductivity, dissociation and recombination, reactivity...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005597
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract The shielding gas used in an arc welding process has a significant influence on the overall performance of the welding system. These gases are argon, helium, oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. This article discusses the shielding gas selection criteria for plasma arc...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001336
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... shape and shielding gas composition in the GTAW process. arc welding cathode tip shape electron discharge gas tungsten arc welding heat transfer nonthermionic emission shielding gas composition thermionic emission THE GAS-TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING (GTAW) process is performed using a welding...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January