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shearable precipitates

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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 35 Strain-life curves for samples of 7050 alloy with shearable precipitates (4 h at 120 °C, or 250 °F) and nonshearable precipitates (96 h at 150 °C, or 300 °F) More
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Published: 15 June 2019
Fig. 26 Strain-life curves for samples of 7050 alloy with shearable precipitates (4 h at 120 °C, or 250 °F) and nonshearable precipitates (96 h at 150 °C, or 300 °F) More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02b.a0006549
EISBN: 978-1-62708-210-5
... Abstract This article describes the effects of cyclic fatigue properties on aluminum alloys. It provides a discussion on strain-control fatigue and the effects of two microstructural features on the strain life of aluminum alloys: shearable precipitates and precipitate-free zones. The article...
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Published: 15 June 2019
Fig. 33 Strain-life curves of large-grained Al-Zn-Mg alloy with shearable precipitates when underaged (4 h at 120 °C, or 250 °F) and nonshearable precipitates plus precipitate-free zones when overaged (96 h at 150 °C, or 300 °F) More
Image
Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 34 Schematic representation of two microstructural features that result in strain localization. τ* represents stress concentration at indicated areas of grain boundaries. (a) Shearable precipitates. (b) Precipitate-free zones More
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Published: 15 June 2019
Fig. 25 Schematic representation of two microstructural features that result in strain localization. τ* represents stress concentration at indicated areas of grain boundaries. (a) Shearable precipitates. (b) Precipitate-free zones More
Image
Published: 15 June 2019
Fig. 27 Strain-life curves for samples of Al-Zn-Mg- x Cu alloys with shearable precipitates (0.01% Cu) and nonshearable precipitates (2.1% Cu). DR, degree of recrystallization. (a) Cycled in dry air. (b) Cycled in distilled water More
Image
Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 36 Strain-life curves for samples of Al-Zn-Mg- x Cu alloys with shearable precipitates (0.01% Cu) and nonshearable precipitates (2.1% Cu). DR, degree of recrystallization. (a) Cycled in dry air. (b) Cycled in distilled water. Source: Ref 64 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 42 Strain-life curves of large-grained Al-Zn-Mg alloy with shearable precipitates when underaged (4 h at 120 °C, or 250 °F) and nonshearable precipitates plus PFZs when overaged (96 h at 150 °C, or 300 °F). Source: Ref 64 More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 32 Pseudo-CSS curve of Al-3.8Cu single crystals containing shearable precipitates. Source: Ref 179 More
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Published: 15 June 2019
Fig. 32 Effect of grain size on the stress-life behavior of an X7075 alloy with shearable precipitates. Source: Ref 53 More
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Published: 15 June 2019
Fig. 29 Influence of degree of recrystallization (DR) and environment on the strain-life behavior of an Al-Zn-Mg-1.6Cu alloy with shearable precipitates More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 38 Influence of degree of recrystallization (DR) and environment on the strain-life behavior of an Al-Zn-Mg-1.6 Cu alloy with shearable precipitates More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 40 Effect of grain size on the strain-life behavior of an alloy with shearable precipitates. The Al-Zn-Mg alloy had large grain size; the Al-Zn-Mg-Zr alloy, small grain size. Source: Ref 68 More
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Published: 15 June 2019
Fig. 31 Effect of grain size on the strain-life behavior of an alloy with shearable precipitates. The Al-Zn-Mg alloy had large grain size; the Al-Zn-Mg-Zr alloy had small grain size. Source: Ref 52 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002406
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... created by slip-induced breakdown of submicron strengthening particles, which occurs more readily at high strength levels ( Ref 8 ). If the strengthening (matrix) precipitates are shearable they may promote strain localization which leads to premature crack nucleation and low fracture toughness. Whether...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002354
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
Book Chapter

By Sammy Tin
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005404
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
.... Weak obstacles, such as solute atoms or small, shearable precipitates, on the other hand, can be bypassed relatively easily without undergoing a large deviation in the local orientation of the dislocation line. Thus, strong and weak interactions can be characterized on the basis of the critical angle...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005599
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... transformations in fusion welding, covering particle dissolution, growth, and coarsening of precipitates in the heat-affected zone. The article discusses the versatility of the internal state variable approach in modeling of nonisothermal transformations for various materials and processes. It describes...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006272
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... Current theories on the development of yield strength indicate that the strengthening contribution from shearable and nonshearable precipitates is proportional to the squareroot of the precipitate volume fraction ( Ref 35 ). Quench factor analysis contradicts this experimentally verified result...