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shear load testing

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006761
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... absorbed during fracture, the percent shear (fibrous) (versus cleavage or flat) fracture on the fracture surface, or the change in width of the specimen (lateral expansion). The impact toughness test can also be used to determine the effect on toughness by microstructural alteration in a material or...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003241
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
...-relaxation testing. Shear testing, torsion testing, and formability testing are also discussed. The discussion of tension testing includes information about stress-strain curves and the properties described by them. compression testing fatigue testing formability testing fracture testing hardness...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003044
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... also discusses the test methods of the four major types of mechanical testing of polymer-matrix composites: tensile, compression, flexural, and shear. compression test environmental exposures fiber-reinforced composite stress-strain relationship flexural test laminate mechanical testing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009012
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... the geometry shown in Fig. 1 ( Ref 2 ) are machined in a chordal orientation. This ensures that the shear strain during torsion testing is in the same orientation as the dominant shear deformation during extrusion. Fifteen specimens are deformed, one at each combination of five working temperatures...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.9781627081764
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009011
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... advantage over solid-bar specimens in that shear-strain and shear-strain-rate gradients are virtually eliminated in the design. This is desirable in workability testing because ambiguities associated with definition of the failure strain and strain rate are eliminated. Moreover, the use of thin-wall tubes...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004030
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... yz , and σ zx are generalized tensor notation for shear stresses τ xy , τ yz , τ zx , respectively Von Mises effective strain increment ( d ε ¯ ) d ε ¯   =   2 9 { ( d ε x x − d ε y y ) 2 + ( d ε y y − d ε z z ) 2...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009009
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... are sensitive to shear. The deformation between the platens includes crossed shear bands from each corner of the platens. This intense shear can cause unstable deformation of hot deformed material in much the same way as it occurs in the cylindrical compression tests referred to previously. ...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009007
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
...-Tension Testing.” In the torsion test, deformation is caused by pure shear, and large strains can be achieved without the limitations imposed by necking ( Ref 2 , 3 ). Because the strain rate is proportional to rotational speed, high strain rates are readily obtained ( Table 1 ). Moreover, friction has...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003030
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... deformation. Figure 1 shows a polymer surface in contact with a hard asperity. Two friction dissipation zones are shown. The interfacial shear zone is a very thin layer (about 100 nm) at the surface. Slip may occur at the interface for some polymeric materials, but it more commonly occurs within the...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003025
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
..., and its molecular state. The strength of a plastic is usually taken as the tensile strength, as determined in a conventional testing machine. As an alternative, flexural strength can be measured, also by ramp excitation. Shear strength and uniaxial compressive strength are also measured as the...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009010
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
.... Therefore, the tension test should be designed and conducted carefully, and testing procedures should be well documented when data are reported. The apparatus used to conduct hot-tension tests comprises a mechanical loading system and equipment for sample heating. A variety of equipment...
Book Chapter

By Peter J. Blau
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003242
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... of metals, in which material from one surface is observed to adhere to the other at high spots (asperities) that are subsequently sheared off. While factors other than adhesion may be involved, it is so historically ingrained in the tribology literature that it will be used here for convenience to...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003057
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... Abstract This article describes testing and characterization methods of ceramics for chemical analysis, phase analysis, microstructural analysis, macroscopic property characterization, strength and proof testing, thermophysical property testing, and nondestructive evaluation techniques...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 17
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v17.a0006478
EISBN: 978-1-62708-190-0
... that other defects can also have critical effect on the host structures. Table 1 Effect of defects in fiber-reinforced composite materials Defect Potential effect on structural performance Delamination Catastrophic failure due to loss of interlaminar shear strength. Typical acceptance...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006026
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... coatings are portable, and testing can and is routinely done in the field. The tests listed in Table 2 evaluate two different adhesion properties, and they use different testing mechanisms. The tape and knife adhesion tests (ASTM D3359 and D6677) are used to evaluate the shear or peel strength of a...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003026
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... Abstract In terms of their electrical properties, plastics can be divided into thermosetting and thermoplastic materials, some of which are conductive or semiconductive. This article provides detailed information on factors that affect the property of plastics. It discusses the major test...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006764
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... Abstract Nondestructive testing (NDT), also known as nondestructive evaluation (NDE), includes various techniques to characterize materials without damage. This article focuses on the typical NDE techniques that may be considered when conducting a failure investigation. The article begins with...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006778
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... the shear lips in the cup-and-cone fracture specimens from tensile tests. During tensile loading, the fracture originates near the specimen center, where hydrostatic stresses develop during the onset of necking and where microvoids develop and grow. Multiple cracks join and spread outward along the...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006781
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
..., while plastic deformation may include both time-independent mechanisms as well as time-dependent mechanisms. The movement of dislocation is primarily driven by shear stresses and may be altered by any energy input into the material system. As an example, compressive hydrostatic stresses may decrease the...