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selective laser melting

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Published: 12 September 2022
Fig. 2 Schematic of laser powder-bed fusion, also known as selective laser melting. Reprinted from Ref 11 with permission from Wiley More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 19 Laser ultrasound (LU) probe mounted on selective laser melting unit for in-process inspection of spreader arm. Courtesy of IOS More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 4 Example of Al 2 O 3 part made using selective laser melting (SLM) process. Source: Ref 64 More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 10 Balling effect in selective laser melting (SLM) processing of ceramic powder. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 4 Microstructures of tungsten powders processed by selective laser melting. (a) Top view along laser scan. (b) Side view perpendicular to laser scan. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 12 September 2022
Fig. 3 (a) Solid model of the designed stent prototype for selective laser melting. (b) Highlighted zones correspond to surfaces with an angle of ˂<45° for the layer plane ( xy ). (c) Hatching strategy and (d) concentric scanning strategies shown with black and red lines, respectively More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 5 (a) Representative structure of selective-laser-melting-processed Inconel 718 with retained melt pool segregation. Source: Ref 12 . (b) Representative structure of electron-beam-melting-processed Inconel 718 with columnar grains aligned with the build direction. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 3 Selective laser melt (SLM) process scanning strategy: (a) zigzag and (b) island. Source: ( Ref 63 ) More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 5 Three-dimensional-printed selective-laser-melted tungsten preclinical x-ray system collimator. Courtesy of M&I Materials More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 13 Microstructure of selective-laser-melted WC-12%Co cemented carbide. Source: Ref 25 More
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Published: 12 September 2022
Fig. 11 Stress/number of cycles plot comparing wrought and selective-laser-melted (SLM) specimens prepared at different build directions. 0° refers to the crack-growth direction being parallel to the build direction; 90° refers to the crack-growth direction being perpendicular to the build More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 3 Defects in selective-laser-melted (SLM) materials. (a) Porosity formed in SLM Ti-6Al-4V. (b) Balling. (c) Hot tears. Source: Ref 26 More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 20 Fracture surfaces of tensile tests from as-built selective-laser-melted Ti-6Al-4V specimens. (a) Cup-and-cone. (b) Dimples. (c) and (d) Quasi-cleavage facets. Source: Ref 26 , 42 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006859
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... Abstract Powder-bed fusion (PBF) is a group of additive manufacturing (AM) processes that includes selective laser sintering, selective laser melting, and electron beam melting. This article explains the processes and parameters of PBF systems that are used for biomedical applications. It also...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 24
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v24.a0006583
EISBN: 978-1-62708-290-7
... Abstract Tungsten, molybdenum, and cemented carbide parts can be produced using several additive manufacturing technologies. This article classifies the most relevant technologies into two groups based on the raw materials used: powder-bed methods, such as selective laser melting, electron beam...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 24
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v24.a0006563
EISBN: 978-1-62708-290-7
... design (CAD) using an energy source, which can be a laser (LPBF) or an electron beam (EPBF) for commercially available systems. The general steps of the PBF processes are: Selective melting of a powder layer with predetermined layer thickness (usually 20 to 100 μm for LPBF and 100 μm for EPBF...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006857
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... processes melt and fuse selective regions of powder layers according to computer-aided design data using an energy source. Current commercially available systems commonly use laser, thus termed laser powder-bed fusion (L-PBF). As an alternative to laser, an electron beam is also used in electron beam powder...
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 1 Schematics of laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) processes. (a) Selective laser melting. Source: Ref 2 . (b) Selective laser sintering. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 12 September 2022
Fig. 4 Powder-bed fusion process parameters. SLS, selective laser sintering; SLM, selective laser melting. Adapted from Ref 56 More
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Published: 30 June 2023
. DLD, direct laser deposition; DEBD, direct electron beam deposition; SLM, selective laser melting; EBM, electron beam melting. Source: Ref 30 More