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secondary ion mass spectroscopy

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Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1986
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0001774
EISBN: 978-1-62708-178-8
... Abstract In secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), an energetic beam of focused ions is directed at the sample surface in a high or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment. The transfer of momentum from the impinging primary ions to the sample surface causes sputtering of surface atoms...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0006683
EISBN: 978-1-62708-213-6
... Abstract This article focuses on the principles and applications of high-sputter-rate dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) for depth profiling and bulk impurity analysis. It begins with an overview of various factors pertinent to sputtering. This is followed by a discussion...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 7 Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy mass spectrum of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 15 Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy mass spectra of polyethylene terephthalate More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 8 Secondary ion mass spectroscopy step-scans across duplex graphite nodules. (a) Duplex graphite nodule. Reprinted with permission from Cambridge University Press. (b) 80% nodularity iron produced through the addition of 0.19% Ce-mischmetal (0.081% Ce). (c) 60% nodularity iron produced More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 11 Secondary ion mass spectroscopy depth profile of an AlAs monolayer doping in GaAs. Comparison between measured points (circles) ( Ref 49 ) and calculations (solid line). Source: Ref 50 More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 6 Positive secondary ion mass spectroscopy spectra (in the form of a bar graph) for high-purity silicon under oxygen bombardment in an ion microscope. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 7 Positive secondary ion mass spectroscopy spectra for a National Bureau of Standards reference steel under oxygen bombardment in an ion microscope. (a) Recorded without a voltage offset. (b) Recorded with a voltage offset to reject low-energy molecular secondary ions More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 9 Positive secondary ion mass spectroscopy spectra for an organometallic silicate film deposited on a silicon substrate acquired using a scanning ion microprobe under inert argon bombardment More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 19 Negative secondary ion mass spectroscopy depth profiles of (a) oxygen and (b) hydrogen as a function of the laser irradiation of an AISI 202 steel acquired using 133 Cs + primary ion bombardment in an ion microscope More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 20 High-resolution secondary ion mass spectroscopy spectra for a phosphorus-doped silicon substrate acquired using 32 O 2 + primary ion bombardment in an ion microscope More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 22 Negative secondary ion mass spectroscopy depth profiles for low-pressure chemical vapor deposition SiO x N y thin films on silicon. (a) NH 3 :N 2 O = 3 during deposition. (b) NH 3 :N 2 O = 0.33 during deposition. Acquired using 133 Cs + beam bombardment in an ion microscope More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 23 Positive secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) depth profiles. (a) Various constituents. (b) Hydrogen in a calcium-boroaluminosilicate glass ribbon after acid etching 16 h in H 2 SO 4 . Acquired using Ar + primary ion bombardment in a scanning ion microprobe and an electron beam More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 24 Positive secondary ion mass spectroscopy depth profiles for alkali-lead-silicate crystal glass. (a) Hazed surface. (b) Cleaned surface. Acquired using 18 O − primary beam bombardment in an ion microscope More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 25 Positive secondary ion mass spectroscopy depth profiles for a lead-silicate glass. (a) Before and (b) after hydrogen reduction to produce a semiconducting surface layer. Acquired using 32 O 2 + primary beam bombardment and electron beam charge neutralization in an ion microscope More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001301
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... surface analysis methods, namely, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ion scattering spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. It also provides useful information on the applications of surface analysis. Auger electron...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003522
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
..., Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction. The article discusses the analysis and interpretation of base material composition and microstructures. Preparation and examination of metallographic specimens in failure analysis are also discussed. The article...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003253
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract This article describes the operation and capabilities of surface analysis methods of metals, including scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It provides...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006943
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... Abstract This article discusses the operating principles, advantages, and limitations of scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy that are used to analyze the surface chemistry of plastics. atomic force...
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 1 Survey of the most important surface analysis techniques. AES (SAM), Auger electron spectroscopy (scanning Auger microscopy). XPS (ESCA), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis). SIMS (SNMS), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (secondary neutral mass More