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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003796
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
...Abstract Abstract This article contains a galvanic series chart that shows the electrochemical voltage ranges of metals and alloys in flowing seawater. Dark boxes in the chart indicate the active behavior of active-passive alloys. galvanic series chart electrochemical voltage Fig...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004105
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... on marine corrosion are also reviewed. corrosion marine corrosion pollutants seawater ocean water variability fouling organisms water flow velocity ALTHOUGH SEAWATER is generally considered to be a corrosive environment, it is not widely understood just how corrosive it is in comparison...
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 16 Corrosion profile of steel piling after 5 years of exposure in seawater at Kure Beach, NC. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 12 Crevice corrosion sites attacked in seawater exposure at 35 °C (95 °F) for various stainless steels having different ferric chloride critical crevice temperatures. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 13 Corrosion potentials of various metals and alloys in flowing seawater at 10 to 25 °C (50 to 80 °F). Flow rate was 2.5 to 4 m/s (8 to 13 ft/s); alloys are listed in order of the potential versus saturated calomel electrode (SCE) that they exhibited. Those metals and alloys indicated More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 13 Galvanic series for seawater. Dark boxes indicate active behavior for alloys that exhibit both active and passive behavior. More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 19 Fretting fatigue failure of steel wire rope after seawater service. Wire diameter was 1.5 mm (0.06 in.). See also Fig. 20 . Courtesy of R.B. Waterhouse, University of Nottingham More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 4 Potential measured on freely exposed specimens in natural seawater at a velocity of 0.5 m/s. SCE, saturated calomel electrode More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 7 Impedance spectra for coated steel exposed to natural seawater for 1, 4, and 7 months at Port Hueneme, CA. (a) Zinc primer, epoxy polyamide midcoat, urethane topcoat. (b) Zinc primer, epoxy polyamide, midcoat, latex topcoat. (c) Epoxy polyamide primer and midcoat, latex topcoat. (d) Epoxy More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 1 Galvanic series for seawater. Dark boxes indicate active behavior of active-passive alloys. More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 1 Galvanic series of metals and alloys in seawater. Alloys are listed in order of the potential they exhibit in flowing seawater; those indicated by the black rectangle were tested in low-velocity or poorly aerated water and at shielded areas may become active and exhibit a potential near More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 13 Chronogravimetric curves for C70600 in quiet, flowing, and tidal seawater. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 14 Chronogravimetric curves for C71500 in quiet, flowing, and tidal seawater. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 18 Corrosion rates for C70600 exposed to seawater with additions of sulfide (0.05 mg/L) and/or Fe 2+ (0.01 mg/L) ions. Source: Ref 38 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 2 Corrosion rates of zinc and steel in atmosphere, soil, and seawater. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 1 Galvanic series for seawater. Dark boxes indicate active behavior of active-passive alloys. Applicable to flowing seawater 2.4–4.0 m/s (8–13 ft/s), 10–27 °C (50–80 °F) More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 3 Galvanic series of metals and alloys in seawater. Alloys are listed in order of the potential they exhibit in flowing seawater; those indicated by the black rectangle were tested in low-velocity or poorly aerated water and at shielded areas may become active and exhibit a potential near More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 48 Effect of velocity of seawater at atmospheric temperature on the corrosion rate of steel More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 25 Zones of corrosion for steel in seawater and the relative corrosion rate in each zone. Source: Ref 108 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 26 Variation of oxygen, pH, and other seawater parameters with depth in the Atlantic ocean. Source: Ref 63 More