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seaming

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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 5 Four degrees of susceptibility to seaming during thread rolling. (A) Negative susceptibility to form seams. Metal flow adjacent to the die surface is slower than in the middle of the roll form. This is characteristic of metals having a relatively high coefficient of friction More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 5 Four degrees of susceptibility to seaming during thread rolling. (a) Negative susceptibility to form seams. Metal flow adjacent to the die surface is slower than in the middle of the roll form. This is characteristic of metals having a relatively high coefficient of friction More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 11 (a) Examples of sheet metal joints created by seaming (hemming). (b) Examples of cupped or tubular parts with seamed joints More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005608
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract This article describes the process applications, advantages, and limitations of resistance seam welding. The fundamentals of lap seam welding are also reviewed. The article details the types of seam welds, namely, lap seam welds and mash seam welds, and the processing equipment used...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001365
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Resistance seam welding (RSEW) is a process in which the heat generated by resistance to the flow of electric current in the work metal is combined with pressure to produce a welded seam. This article discusses the various classes of the RSEW process, namely roll spot welding...
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 11 Process variations of seam welding. (a) Lap seam welding. (b) Mash seam welding. (c) Metal finish seam welding. (d) Electrode wire seam welding. (e) Foil butt seam welding More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 17 Muffler lock seam constructions. The double-lock seam construction (right) helps prevent liquid penetration between the wraps. More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 18 Diagrams of seam and mash seam welding More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 2 (a) Lap seam weld, (b) mash seam weld with flat electrodes, and (c) mash seam weld with radiused (contoured) electrodes. Flat electrodes in mash seam welding should not be used when sheet thickness is less than 1mm (0.040 in.). Radiused electrodes can be used for sheet thicker than 1mm More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 26 Seam in rolled 4130 steel bar (a) Closeup of seam. Note the linear characteristics of this flaw. (b) Micrograph showing cross section of the bar. Seam is normal to the surface and filled with oxide. 30× More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 36 (a) Surface of Ti-6Al-4V bar with seams. (b) Section through seams showing oxide and blunt tips. Kroll’s etch More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 9 Seam in rolled 4130 steel bar. (a) Closeup of seam. Note the linear characteristics of this flaw. (b) Micrograph showing cross section of the bar. Seam is normal to the surface and filled with oxide. Original magnification: 30× More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 19 Setup for seam welding a circular flange disc into a cylindrical container of small diameter Thickness of each workpiece D 1 , in. min. D 2 , in. min. D 3 , in. W 2 , in. W 3 , in. 0.010 2 1 3 4 12 1 8 1 4 0.020 3 2 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 20 Effect of electrode force on weldability lobes in seam welding of 1.2 mm (0.05 in.) thick mild steel (wide seam with alternating current). Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 21 Weldability lobes for narrow seam welding of a mild steel (alternating current). Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 22 Weldability lobes for wide seam welding of a mild steel (alternating current). Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 19 Catalytic converter assembly consisting of seams joined by the nonvacuum electron beam welding process More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 7 Conventional overlapping spot-pulsed seam weld (left) compared to SHADOW weld (right) in a brass gear-to-steel shaft weld. 0.3 mm (0.01 in.) shaft diameter. Source: Ref 48 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 8 Early machine for welding the longitudinal seam in a hot water tank with an automatic carbon arc welding head. More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 3 Basic configuration of joints and resultant welds formed in resistance seam welding. (a) Lap seam welding. (b) Mash seam welding. (c) Finish seam with chamfered electrode. (d) Electrode wire seam welding. More