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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 4 Simple flowsheet for presorting scrap. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 10 Aluminum scrap at Northwest Aluminum Specialties Inc. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 11 Control panel for two 7.5 ton, 2.2 MW, 65 Hz induction crucible furnaces for melting aluminum scrap. Source: Ref 15 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001118
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
... on the recycling of nonferrous alloys, namely, aluminum, copper, magnesium, tin, lead, zinc, and titanium, providing details on the sources, consumption and classification of scrap, and the technological trends and developments in recycling. aluminum recycling copper recycling lead recycling magnesium...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001053
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... that deal in scrap can be categorized as either processors or brokers. Processors purchase iron and steel scrap and process, or upgrade, the scrap to meet customer needs. Brokers act as intermediaries, purchasing the scrap from a source and selling it unaltered to a consumer. There are more scrap processors...
Book Chapter

By John C. Bittence
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003222
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... materials. Because of the ensuing economic and legislative incentives, recycled metals are now recognized as a vast source of natural resources for recovery. Today, recycled scrap is a major raw material for the metals industry, supplying up to 100% of the feedstock for some products. Producing many...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006484
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... recycling became more prevalent, because the source aluminum is now mostly on the ground rather than in it. Secondary aluminum, produced from scrap and waste materials, currently comprises nearly half of the aluminum produced in Europe and North America, and the fraction continues to grow. Metal production...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006318
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
... and limiting their concentration, often at very low levels, can significantly degrade casting performance. The primary source of these tramp elements is from the steel scrap, pig iron, and cast iron returns used as major charge materials for cast iron melting. Other trace elements are intentionally added...
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 2 Flow diagram for aluminum in the United States, showing the role of recycling in the industry. Scrap recycling (lower left) includes scrap collectors, processors, dealers and brokers, sweat furnace operators, and dross reclaimers. Source: U.S. Bureau Mines More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
orientations. (b) Potential nesting of blanks for the part shown in (a). Layout A is required for directional alloys such as C51000 and results in 38% scrap; a nondirectional alloy such as C68800 would allow the more efficient layout B, with 23% scrap. Dimensions given in millimeters (1 in.=25.4 mm). Source More
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005197
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... is to be melted each day, distance from the scrap-processing source, reliability of the transportation system, severe weather issues, and so on. Each charge material needs to be transferred to a weigh hopper, where a designated weight is measured out and transferred to a charge bucket for travel to the top...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003223
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... and design to recycle the discarded product. Fig. 1 Possibilities for recycling. Source: Ref 1 The most obvious means of recycling products at the end of their life cycle is to provide a closed-loop or scrap stream to return the product to the manufacturer. The very successful examples...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006052
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
..., Iron, Nickel Cobalt is the most common binder in hard metal production, but nickel and iron are also used. Cobalt processing is reviewed in detail in Ref 24 . The largest sources of cobalt are from secondary ore sources (i.e., nickel laterites) and cemented carbide scrap. Typically...
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 3 U.S. aluminum scrap consumption by type of company for the years 1972 to 1986. Source: U.S. Bureau of Mines More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 19 Percentage of U.S. titanium scrap that was recycled to ingot from 1964 to 1988. Source: U.S. Bureau of Mines More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 14 Predicted melting times for vertical steel plates and cylinders, 2.5 mm (0.098 in.) scrap thickness and 0.1% C composition, [(%S) i = 0.03] immersed in stagnant iron-carbon baths at different bath temperatures. Source: Ref 27 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003471
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... interspersed in composites accounts for some of the difficulties in recycling postconsumer and factory-generated scrap. Nonetheless, many researchers have attempted to develop technically feasible, economically viable, and environmentally acceptable recycling processes for polymer-matrix composites...
Image
Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 5 Shredder and sorter for scrap automobiles. (a) Vehicles are shredded. Air separates out most light nonmetals (1) from heavier materials (2). (b) Magnetic belt separates ferromagnetic metals from nonmagnetic materials. (c) Heavy-metal flotation. (d) Melting furnaces further sort out More
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
oxygen process; LBE, lance bubbling equilibrium; KMS, Kloeckner Metallurgy Scrap; BOF, basic oxygen furnace. Source: Ref 1 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002438
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... are blown off the remaining scrap or “No. 2 frag” is deposited in a large pile. “No. 1 frag” comes from a uniform material source where contamination and mixed material is not a problem. The “No. 2 frag” is more common and comes from a mixed input stream such as has been described (cars, washing machines...