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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 10 Melting processes for UBC scrap. (a) Early can scrap melter. (b) More-advanced swirl scrap charge melter, which uses a continuous melting process More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 23 An SAE 8620 gear was running 100% scrap in carburizing and hardening, with taper in the teeth of as much as 0.09 mm (0.0035 in.). Production was satisfactory when stock was added to back up the teeth (as shown in the schematic), and six holes were added to improve the flow of quenching More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 4 Producing structural steel in an induction furnace: melting selected scrap and casting More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 10 Aluminum scrap at Northwest Aluminum Specialties Inc. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 1 Simple flow diagram for presorting scrap More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 2 Identification of scrap by spark analysis equipment More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 5 Shredder and sorter for scrap automobiles. (a) Vehicles are shredded. Air separates out most light nonmetals (1) from heavier materials (2). (b) Magnetic belt separates ferromagnetic metals from nonmagnetic materials. (c) Heavy-metal flotation. (d) Melting furnaces further sort out More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 8 Swirl scrap charge melter, which uses a continuous melting process for UBC scrap More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 9 Flow diagram for recycling of copper scrap More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 44 The fill and scrap operators. (a) A binary image with holes in the objects. (b) After fill. Note the merging neighboring objects. (c) The original binary image after inversion with the NOT operator. Small black holes in objects have become small white objects. (d) Elimination of small More
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Published: 01 January 2001
Fig. 7 Estimated flat lay-up and scrap rates for 150 and 300 mm (6 and 12 in.) tape widths. (a) Lay-up rate for 150 mm (6 in.) tape. (b) Scrap rate for 150 mm (6 in.) tape. (c) Lay-up rate for 300 mm (12 in.) tape. (d) Scrap rate for 300 mm (12 in.) tape More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 6 Charge yard arrangement showing scrap delivery, storage bins, weigh hoppers, and charging bucket More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 7 Cokeless cupola showing scrap charging, water-cooled grates, burner location, and so on More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 8 Cokeless cupola showing scrap charging, water-cooled grates, burner location, and so on More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 4 Charge yard arrangement showing scrap delivery, storage bins, weigh hoppers, and charging bucket. Coke and limestone are usually stored in covered overhead storage bins and are discharged into a weigh hopper and then into the charge buckets. More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 1 Electric arc furnace being charged with baled scrap. Courtesy of the American Iron and Steel Institute More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 4 Simple flowsheet for presorting scrap. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 6 Identification of scrap by experimental spark analysis equipment More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 3 U.S. aluminum scrap consumption by type of company for the years 1972 to 1986. Source: U.S. Bureau of Mines More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 19 Percentage of U.S. titanium scrap that was recycled to ingot from 1964 to 1988. Source: U.S. Bureau of Mines More